Airbus has turned to 3-D printing to keep early deliveries of its new A350 widebody airliner on schedule and has passed the 1,000-flight-part mark in its first use of the technology on a significant scale in production. The non-load-bearing interior components—which include brackets, cable-routing plates and finish pieces—are 3-D-printed by Airbus from Ultem 9085 thermoplastic using Stratasys fusion deposition modeling (FDM) machines. Satellite launch vehicle manufacturer ...

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