Too often we see an NTSB finding that states: “The probable cause(s) of this accident [involving a highly experienced airman] is determined to be the pilot’s decision to initiate and continue flight into known adverse weather conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation, a loss of airplane control and a subsequent inflight breakup. Such is the case with a Key Lime Air Fairchild SA227 (Swearingen Metroliner) that broke up in cumulus activity over Camilla, Georgia, on Dec. ...

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