Although nearly as rare as humble fighter pilots, catastrophic engine failures do occur. And when they do, there is a good reason for that adjective. Assuming the pilots get the aircraft down safely, the failed engine will have to be removed and sent to a shop for repair. Meanwhile, a loaner will have to be found and installed to keep the aircraft in use. Once the failed mill is repaired, the process reverses. The cost of all that—the shipping, hangar work, repair, engine ...

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