Amy Butler

Amy
Butler
Senior Pentagon Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Amy is Aviation Week's senior Pentagon editor and has flown on a variety of military aircraft since joining the staff, including a 9-hr. HH-60G Pave Hawk search-and-rescue mission after Hurricane Katrina, and the MV-22 Osprey, UH-72A Lakota, F/A-18F Super Hornet, F-16CJ, BAE Hawk trainer and C-2 Greyhound carrier capable transport.
 
As senior Pentagon editor, Amy covers major U.S. military aviation programs, including the Joint Strike Fighter, next-generation bomber and KC-46A aerial refueler. She also specializes in coverage of missile defense and military space programs.
 
Prior to joining Aviation Week, she was the Pentagon bureau chief for Defense Daily covering multiple services' programs, the defense budget and Defense Department dealings with Congress. She worked as the managing editor of Inside the Air Force covering Air Force procurement and policy issues. Prior to that, she was the The Daily Sun's military reporter in Warner Robins, Ga., where she participated in a two-week media trip to Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia, and reported on Air Force activities supporting the no-fly zone over Iraq. 
 
Amy studied English literature and history at Mercer University in Macon, Ga., and took a term at Oxford University, England.

Articles
Podcast: The Future of Fighters and Air Force One 1
Our editors discuss adaptive engine technology, sixth-generation fighters, threats to the F-35 and the next presidential aircraft.
ULA Snags More Sole-Source Launches After SpaceX Suit Is Settled 
The Jan. 28 contract modification is worth $382.9 million for three missions. It is part of a $4.7 billion “bulk buy” contract including a guarantee of 36 engine cores – 28 missions – for ULA.
A U.S. Air Force EELV Program Timeline 
The Rise and Fall of a Launch Monopoly?
Atlas V Stung by Last Year’s Launch Fracas 
SpaceX-USAF legal settlement offers little near-term gain for SpaceX, but it appears to serve the company’s strategic goals.
Boeing Nabs Sole Source Prime On Next Air Force One 68
Noting that the 747-8 is the only platform "manufactured in the United States [that] when fully missionized meets the necessary capabilities established to execute the presidential support mission," Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said competition will be sought at the subsystem level for the program.
Land of Opportunity in Space
The boom in small Earth-observation satellites is expanding a market in which businesses and governments alike can gather valuable insight for monitoring climate change, political hot spots, business activities and disaster zones.
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Eyes Role for Small Satellites 1
The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is crafting a strategy to leverage the influx of imagery available from the many new information services providers working today.
USAF To Boost Launch Competitions as SpaceX Shelves Lawsuit 3
SpaceX has agreed to drop its lawsuit against the U.S. Air Force. In return, the service is vowing to increase the number of launches it plans to compete.
Trio of Defense Giants Posture For Sixth-Gen Fighters 
Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman each have formed teams to plan for these so-called sixth-generation fighter competitions, though actual developments — and real funds — are not likely to surface for years.
Podcast: U.S. Defense Budget
A preview of programs and issues to watch for during the first week of February, when the Pentagon makes its budget request to Congress.
U.S. Air Force Reopens Next-Gen Air Defense Radar Selection 
The reassessment of the potential $1 billion program expected to take four months. It is unclear if the service will reassess existing bids or allow competitors to submit amended proposals.
Thaad-ER In Search Of A Mission 3
Lockheed Martin sees China’s hypersonic advances as a rationale to resurrect extended-range Thaad project.
Certification Process Slows SpaceX’s Market Push 
SpaceX’s near-term plans for U.S. government work have been thwarted by certification requirements.
USAF Still Targeting F-35A IOC By December 2016 
U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh says he’s confident a strategy that will be proposed in the fiscal 2016 budget to mitigate a possible maintainer shortfall will allow the F-35A to achieve initial operational capability (IOC) by late 2016 as planned.
Pentagon To Fund Three More Years of U-2 Operations  2
The plan to terminate the U-2 is reversed, reopening a debate at the Pentagon about high-altitude reconnaissance platforms.
 
Blogs
Mar 2, 2015
blog

1969: The Concorde's Hopeful First Flight 1

On March 2, 1969, Aviation Week’s Donald Fink was on hand to witness the first flight of the supersonic Anglo-French Concorde in Toulouse, France....More
Mar 1, 2015
blog

U.S. Spacewalkers Complete Space Station Docking Port Antenna Installations, Cable Extensions 2

"That was an amazing effort," said NASA spacewalker Terry Virts....More
Feb 27, 2015
blog

NavWeek: Running With the Pac

The general feeling among many of China’s naval neighbors and in U.S. military circles is that China has been turning into a bit of a bully in (re)staking territorial claims in the seas off its coasts....More
Feb 27, 2015
blog

A400M Faces Production Challenges in 2015

Initially, Airbus was supposed to deliver 22 aircraft to at least four customers this year....More
Feb 27, 2015
blog

Pilot Report: Flying The Embraer 170 (2003)

Former Editor-in-Chief Dave North wrote pilot reports on more than 120 aircraft during his career at Aviation Week. His visits to Embraer began in 1978, long before the Brazilian company’s privatization and emergence as a powerhouse in regional jets. Here, he recalls his Embraer experiences, culminating in a test flight of the E170....More
Feb 26, 2015
blog

France's Defense Procurement Agency Saved By Rafale Sale

French exports were up in 2014, but the year ahead brings uncertainty....More
Feb 25, 2015
blog

Inside The Roc's Lair 17

A rare glimpse of the world's largest aircraft under assembly in Mojave, California...More
Feb 25, 2015
blog

Pilot Report: Aviation Week Flies The Lockheed Martin U-2 (1999)

In 1999 Aviation Week's former Editor-in-Chief reached the highest altitude he had ever flown, in a U-2. Read his pilot report....More

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