The consultancy MarketsandMarkets predicts that demand for aerospace interior core materials—honeycomb, foam and balsa—will grow at more than 9% annually to $220 million by 2021.                                                                       

These core materials are mainly used between thin sheets of composites to reduce weight while giving passengers more space. They must resist both heat and flame. Core OEMs are preparing for growth.

Philipp Angst, director of product management for foams at 3A Composites, expects the number of new aircraft will grow in single digits annually, but foam core applications will grow in low double digits.

“We are constantly improving the performance and quality of our products for the aerospace market, especially AIREX R82,” Angst says. “And we have recently significantly increased production capacity for this high-performance foam core.”

The company is investing in a product upgrade to further improve its foam’s unique benefits for aerospace.

Angst argues that 3A is unrivaled when it comes to foam design and technology. “We own diverse foam production lines with multiple high-pressure presses, as well as physical and chemical foam-extrusion lines, including co-extrusion, with their laboratory, research and development capabilities,” he says.

3A has already tested the vast majority of foamable polymers and is eager to further extend its expertise in foam cores. Its experience allows 3A to design optimal structural foam products, tailored for each specific market.

Euro-Composites produces honeycomb cores from Nomex, Kevlar, glass fiber and aluminum. Non-metallic honeycombs are coated mostly with phenolic resin, Chief Sales Officer Horst Willkomm says. Around 40% of sales are honeycomb sheets, the rest panels, formed and milled honeycomb, drop-in parts, kits and complete structures.

Willkomm predicts aerospace demand for honeycomb cores will grow at 5 to 10% annually, due to airlines’ desire for less weight and better interiors. EC has recently more than doubled capacity. It now operates 36 CNC milling machines, 14 presses and five production lines. The sales exec insists that constant innovation distinguishes EC from its competitors. It now has a patent pending for a new 3D honeycomb core that will allows easy 3D forming.

The consultancy MarketsandMarkets predicts that demand for aerospace interior core materials—honeycomb, foam and balsa—will grow at more than 9% annually to $220 million by 2021.
These core materials are mainly used between thin sheets of composites to reduce weight while giving passengers more space. They must resist both heat and flame. Core OEMs are preparing for growth.

Philipp Angst, director of product management for foams at 3A Composites, expects the number of new aircraft will grow in single digits annually, but foam core applications will grow in low double digits.

“We are constantly improving the performance and quality of our products for the aerospace market, especially AIREX R82,” Angst says. “And we have recently significantly increased production capacity for this high-performance foam core.”

The company is investing in a product upgrade to further improve its foam’s unique benefits for aerospace.

Angst argues that 3A is unrivaled when it comes to foam design and technology. “We own diverse foam production lines with multiple high-pressure presses, as well as physical and chemical foam-extrusion lines, including co-extrusion, with their laboratory, research and development capabilities,” he says.

3A has already tested the vast majority of foamable polymers and is eager to further extend its expertise in foam cores. Its experience allows 3A to design optimal structural foam products, tailored for each specific market.

Euro-Composites produces honeycomb cores from Nomex, Kevlar, glass fiber and aluminum. Non-metallic honeycombs are coated mostly with phenolic resin, Chief Sales Officer Horst Willkomm says. Around 40% of sales are honeycomb sheets, the rest panels, formed and milled honeycomb, drop-in parts, kits and complete structures.

Willkomm predicts aerospace demand for honeycomb cores will grow at 5 to 10% annually, due to airlines’ desire for less weight and better interiors. EC has recently more than doubled capacity. It now operates 36 CNC milling machines, 14 presses and five production lines. The sales exec insists that constant innovation distinguishes EC from its competitors. It now has a patent pending for a new 3D honeycomb core that will allows easy 3D forming.