Graham Warwick

Graham
Warwick
Technology Managing Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Graham leads Aviation Week's coverage of technology, focusing on engineering and technology across the aerospace industry, with a special focus on identifying technologies of strategic importance to aviation, aerospace and defense. 
 
Born and educated in Scotland, he graduated in aeronautical engineering and worked in advanced design at Hawker Siddeley Aviation in the U.K. before becoming an aerospace journalist. Before joining Aviation Week in April 2008, he spent almost 30 years with weekly aerospace news magazine Flight International, most recently as Americas Editor based in the U.S. 
 
Graham is a winner of the Decade of Excellence award for aviation journalism, and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.
 
In 2013 the Jesse H. Neal award for Best Technical Content was awarded to Graham Warwick and Guy Norris for their Advanced Propulsion feature.

Articles
Photo Gallery: The Week In Aerospace and Defense 
A roundup of the week's top stories in aerospace and defense.
Podcast: Looking Ahead to the Paris Air Show 2015
Although the industry is in good financial shape, both commercial and military aviation are challenged with steep production ramp ups.
Experienced Airline Exec Brought In To Lead CSeries To Success  3
As CSeries development progresses, Bombardier turns to supporting entry into service with a dispatch reliability that impresses airlines and, hopefully, produces orders.
FAA Still Lagging In Adopting UAS Rules  1
Recent movement by the FAA to speed rulemaking on UAS operations may be good for commerce, but is the agency now moving too fast?
Textron Touts Aerosonde’s Reliability Ahead Of SOC UAS Contest 
With its contract to provide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) services to U.S. Special Operations Command (Socom) up for recompetition, Textron Systems is touting the improved reliability of its Aerosonde Mk4.7G small medium-endurance unmanned aircraft.
Congress Eyes Interim Rules To Speed UAS Use
“It may take the FAA a couple of years to finalize their rule. Rather than wait two years to fly unmanned aircraft, our legislation will allow business to work with the test sites to get their aircraft and pilots certified to fly remotely piloted aircraft,” Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) tells Aviation Week.
The Week in Technology, May 25-29, 2015  3
Low-boom supersonic drop planned; Airbus shortlists Fly Your Ideas finalists; compete to print a Mars habitat; JAXA flies electric propulsion; full-speed shots for electromagnetic catapult.
Sikorsky Raider Flight Opens New Page For Rotorcraft  9
First flight under its belt, Sikorsky aims to prove Raider’s breakthrough performance, looks ahead to operational demonstrations and the possibility of making the high-speed helicopter optionally piloted.
FAA: UASs Can Fly Below 200 Ft. At Test Sites  1
The new certificates of authorization (COA) will allow UASs up to 55 lb. operated by the six test sites to fly at or below 200 ft. anywhere in the U.S. except in restricted airspace and areas close to airports.
Sikorsky Conducts First Flight Of S-97 Helo 5
Sikorsky flew its S-97 Raider rigid coaxial rotor high-speed helicopter for the first time on May 22, completing a hover and low-speed flight at the company’s development flight center in West Palm Beach, Florida.
Sikorsky’s S-97 Raider First Flight 2
Sikorsky’s S-97 Raider high-speed helicopter made an hour-long first flight on May 22 at the company’s development flight center in West Palm Beach, Florida. The rigid coaxial-rotor Raider hovered and maneuvered at low speed, with its pusher propulsor disconnected (but turning due to friction). The flight begins a year-long, roughly 100-flight-hour test program to expand to Raider’s flight envelope to meet Sikorsky’s key targets of 220-kt. cruise speed carrying weapons, hover at 6,000 ft. on a 95F day, and 3g maneuverability at speed.
FAA Allows Test Sites To Fly UASs Below 200 ft. 
FAA-designated unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test sites have been given blanket authorization to fly small UASs up to 200 ft. altitude in a move to speed research into integrating UASs into national airspace.
FAA Allows Test Sites To Fly UASs Below 200 ft. 
FAA-designated unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test sites have been given blanket authorization to fly small UASs up to 200 ft. altitude in a move to speed research into integrating UASs into national airspace.
FAA Allows Test Sites To Fly UASs Below 200 ft. 
FAA-designated unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test sites have been given blanket authorization to fly small UASs up to 200 ft. altitude in a move to speed research into integrating UASs into national airspace.
The Fortnight In Aerospace And Defense
Our roundup of the top stories in aerospace and defense from the last two weeks.
Special Topics
 

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