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EDITED BY BRUCE D. NORDWALL

EDITED BY BRUCE D. NORDWALL
Articles
BRATISLAVA, SLOVAKIA, WILL GET THE SECOND 

BRATISLAVA, SLOVAKIA, WILL GET THE SECOND national military command-and-control center in Eastern Europe that will be fully compatible with U.S. and NATO systems. Northrop Grumman is building the center under contract from the Air Force Electronic Systems Command at Hanscom AFB, Mass. Operation is slated to begin in March 2005. Military commanders will receive read-only feeds of radar data from the air sovereignty operations center and will be able to customize the system for civil emergencies as well.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS' ABILITY TO PREDICT 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS' ABILITY TO PREDICT exactly when severe weather will move into an airport or approach path should improve significantly when a new software tool is added to the Integrated Terminal Weather System. ITWS, which is operational at six airports, with seven more pending in 2005, currently predicts 20 min. ahead. With the new software, controllers will be able to look an hour ahead and see storm location and size, accurate to within 10 min. or 10 mi. They will also be able to differentiate three levels of snow or rain, from heavy to light.

IN THE RACE TO PRODUCE LOW-DRAG 

IN THE RACE TO PRODUCE LOW-DRAG, high-gain fuselage-mounted satcom antennas, Tecom Industries of Thousand Oaks, Calif., has an 18-lb. unit that's only 1.6 in. high, 12 in. wide and 28 in. long. The beam-steering unit is housed within the HGA-9000 antenna and delivers higher data-rate and lower angle coverage than existing Aero-H antennas, according to Tecom. The high-gain phased-array antenna is compatible with Inmarsat's Aero-H/H+ and Swift 64 services that provide cockpit and passenger voice, passenger fax, news and weather broadcasts and PC data.

AT THE FAA'S AND AIR TRANSPORT ASSN.'S 

AT THE FAA'S AND AIR TRANSPORT ASSN.'S request, the RTCA is launching an investigation into the danger posed by portable electronic devices (PEDs)--particularly cell phones and other transmitting devices--to aircraft systems. A previous review was conducted in 1996 (AW&ST Sept. 9, 1996, p. 82). The challenge will be to develop a process that can be applied to a wide variety of equipment, including ultrawideband devices, transmitting personal digital assistants, pico-cell networks for cell phones, wireless medical devices and RFIDs.

LITHIUM ION BATTERIES PRODUCED BY SAFT 

LITHIUM ION BATTERIES PRODUCED BY SAFT in Bordeaux, France, are replacing traditional nickel hydrogen ones in some satellites and UAVs. Li-ion batteries are 30% lighter than nickel hydrogen ones, take less space, generate less heat and give more power. The nickel hydrogen batteries being replaced weigh nearly 600 lb., roughly one-quarter of the satellite's weight. Eutelsat W3A, launched in March, was the first to use li-ion batteries. Hispasat's Amazonas telecom and broadcast satellite followed in August.

ITT INDUSTRIES PLANS A LABORATORY 

ITT INDUSTRIES PLANS A LABORATORY demonstration in December of its advanced digital radar warning receiver integrated with a laser warning receiver. Both one-on-one and multiple-threat scenarios are scheduled. The Army Aviation and Missile Command contract allows ITT to complete the RWR/LWR development. Sharing a central processor between four radio-frequency sensors and the four laser sensors will reduce system weight. The demonstration system, including the AVR-2 LWR, will be a variant of ITT's ALQ-211 RF countermeasures family.

TWO PARABOLIC ANTENNAS THAT WERE ONCE USED 

TWO PARABOLIC ANTENNAS THAT WERE ONCE USED by the Soviet Union to spy on the West by intercepting unencrypted satellite transmissions are now available for other uses, including radio-astronomy. The 32-meter- and 16-meter-dia. dish antennas are located in the village of Irbene, 30 km. (19 mi.) north of the port of Ventspils, Latvia. A scientist working at the site says these antennas have the best capabilities in Northern Europe, based on performance measurements and the Russian technical specifications. The larger antenna has a pointing accuracy of 20 arc-sec.

UNIVERSAL AVIONICS WILL USE THALES 

UNIVERSAL AVIONICS WILL USE THALES' SkyNav GG12W GPS receiver integrated circuit boards in the company's new flight management systems for business jets. Developed specifically for aviation use, the boards receive GPS and the Russian Glonass satnav signals, as well as the GPS' Wide Area Augmentation System signals. The receiver operates in both autonomous and differential modes, which is valuable for precision approaches, and has extensive antijamming capabilities, according to Tucson, Ariz.-based Universal Avionics.

THE FAA HAS IMPROVED ITS PROCESSES 

THE FAA HAS IMPROVED ITS PROCESSES for acquiring ATC modernization software, according to a Government Accountability Office report. Since software has long been the Achilles' heel for large integrated systems, the congressional watchdog looked at four major projects: the En Route Automation Modernization (ERAM), Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS), Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-X) and Voice Switching and Control System (VSCS).

THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH-SPEED 

THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH-SPEED optical communications systems may be enhanced as a result of a new theory from scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The hypothesis describes light-pulse dynamics in optical fibers and explains how an interplay of noise, line imperfections and pulse collisions leads to deterioration of information in optical fiber lines. A better understanding of the physics will allow comparison of different techniques for suppressing information outages.

ELECTRONIC CONTROL SECURITY INC. WILL INSTALL SYSTEMS 

ELECTRONIC CONTROL SECURITY INC. WILL INSTALL SYSTEMS using a variety of passive infrared and video technologies to protect classified U.S. Air Force installations from unauthorized entry or access. The Clifton, N.J.-based company specializes in perimeter security solutions for military and homeland security needs, including tactical automated sensor systems for rapid deployment to forward bases and remote-controlled aerial surveillance.

SCALING MEMORY DEVICES TO MAKE THEM EVEN SMALLER 

SCALING MEMORY DEVICES TO MAKE THEM EVEN SMALLER is just as necessary as shrinking logic devices, but researchers will detail at IEDM how much harder it is. In addition to the main memory types--dynamic random access memory (DRAM), static random access memory (SRAM) and flash--some developments in magnetic RAM and ferroelectric RAM, and other concepts will be discussed. Debate on two widely used memories--flash and SRAM--will continue.

A FOLDING-REFLECTOR DESIGN PROVIDES A LOW-DRAG 

A FOLDING-REFLECTOR DESIGN PROVIDES A LOW-DRAG satellite antenna that will give airlines access to Arinc's Commercial SKYLink satellite broadband service. SKYLink's Ku-band coverage of North America became operational in April, providing e-mail, the Internet, and real-time TV for passengers, as well as applications for the pilots in the cockpit. Satellite signals can be simultaneously received at 5 Mbps., and transmitted from the aircraft at 256 Kbps.

ADVANCES IN ELECTRONICS FROM SOME OF THE WORLD'S 

ADVANCES IN ELECTRONICS FROM SOME OF THE WORLD'S leading researchers will be described at the 2004 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM). Special sessions on emerging technologies will focus on topics such as nanocomputing devices, and possible solutions to some of the interconnect and manufacturing challenges. Responding to the demand for smaller, faster integrated circuits will be a preview of the next-generation 65-nanometer integrated circuits, shrinking from the current 90-nanometer chips.

THE AGENCY FOR THE SAFETY OF AERIAL NAVIGATION 

THE AGENCY FOR THE SAFETY OF AERIAL NAVIGATION in Africa and Madagascar (Asecna) has awarded Thales a 20-million-euro ($24-million) turnkey contract to supply and install four air traffic management systems, each with a monopulse Mode S secondary surveillance radar. Asecna controls airspace 1.5 times the size of Europe, and represents 16 member countries--14 western and central African nations, as well as Madagascar and France. Receiving the ATM systems will be Dakar, Senegal; Abidjan, Ivory Coast; Brazzaville, Congo Republic; and Niamey, Niger.

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