John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1978 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor, instrument instructor, multi-engine rated commercial pilot, and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites, including the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.

After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor before joining Aviation Week in 2012.

He, his wife, and two high school-aged boys live in the wilds of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where their two Weimaraners, EZ and Porter, can run amok. 

Articles
U.S. Looks For Radar ‘Spectrum Efficiencies’ 
The FAA and the departments of Defense, Homeland Security and Commerce are planning to create a new cross-government program to investigate replacement options for long-range, short-range and weather radar systems supporting the aviation sector in the continental U.S.
New Drift Tests To Buoy MH370 Hunt As Underwater Search Wanes 
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau and a government research lab will set loose “drifter buoys” along with satellite tracker-equipped models of the flaperon from MH370 found on La Reunion Island in July 2015.
Rockwell Collins Nears Finish Line With 737 MAX Cockpit Displays 
Boeing’s goal was to maintain maximum commonality between the 737NG and the 737 MAX, in part to retain common type ratings between the two and minimal “differences training” for pilots.
New Stall, Upset Training Puts Alaska Airlines On Cutting Edge  23
A full stall in a commercial jetliner is an encounter few pilots have had the pleasure or pain of experiencing, but one that all U.S. airline pilots will come to know in a few short years.
Runway Collision Concern Spurs NTSB Special Investigation 
Alarmed by a rising number of the most severe types of runway incursions, the U.S. NTSB has launched a one-year special investigation report in cooperation with the FAA, unions and industry.
ALPA Expects Delay In Draft Battery Packaging Standards 
The head of the Air Line Pilots Association’s (ALPA) dangerous goods panel said the first draft of a performance-based packaging standard for lithium-ion batteries will not be ready by November, and will likely slip into early 2017.
How Does A Boeing 737 Handle On A Full Stall? 19
Aviation Week senior editor John Croft demonstrates recovery from several full stalls during his sampling of the training in Alaska Airlines’ Boeing 737-800 simulator.
U.S. Looks For Radar ‘Spectrum Efficiencies’ 
The FAA and the departments of Defense, Homeland Security and Commerce are planning to create a new cross-government program to investigate replacement options for long-range, short-range and weather radar systems supporting the aviation sector in the continental U.S.
U.S. Looks For Radar ‘Spectrum Efficiencies’ 
The FAA and the departments of Defense, Homeland Security and Commerce are planning to create a new cross-government program to investigate replacement options for long-range, short-range and weather radar systems supporting the aviation sector in the continental U.S.
U.S. Looks For Radar ‘Spectrum Efficiencies’ 
The FAA and the departments of Defense, Homeland Security and Commerce are planning to create a new cross-government program to investigate replacement options for long-range, short-range and weather radar systems supporting the aviation sector in the continental U.S.
Laser-Based Air Data Systems Come Of Age  1
High-profile failures of traditional air data systems—using pitot tubes and angle-of-attack vanes—have ignited a new generation of laser-based replacement systems that offer higher performance, without moving parts.
JAL, Changi Make Safety Changes 
Japan Airlines (JAL) and Singapore Changi Airport have modified procedures following the attempted takeoff of a JAL Boeing 767-300ER on a taxiway parallel to the correct takeoff runway at Changi early on the morning of July 12, 2015.
Podcast: Will Airplanes Ever Fly Themselves? 17
Self-flying aircraft are even further off than self-driving cars. But technologies that assist pilots are advancing—including one that will take control of the aircraft to avoid a collision if humans do not react quickly enough. Our editors bring you up to date and explore what might be possible.
Rockwell Collins Focuses On Connectivity, Human-Machine Symbiosis 
As the avionics-maker sees the finish line on a crush of Pro Line Fusion integrated cockpit certifications, engineers are turning to the next challenge.
ATSB Tackles ATR 72 Tail-Overstress Risk  28
ATR in-house investigation found similar incidents regarding the “pitch disconnect” feature that were not previously understood.
 

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