John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1978 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor, instrument instructor, multi-engine rated commercial pilot, and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites, including the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.

After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor before joining Aviation Week in 2012.

He, his wife, and two high school-aged boys live in the wilds of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where their two Weimaraners, EZ and Porter, can run amok. 

Articles
MS804 Mystery Endures 
Despite some automated messages indicating smoke in a lavatory and electronics bay sent just before the crash, investigators are no closer to understanding what brought down EgyptAir Flight 804.
Cirrus Tackles the Chute for its Jet 3
For Cirrus Aircraft, developing its largest clean sheet aircraft to date, the Vision SF50 jet, has been a Herculean task that’s taken almost a decade.
The Next Big Thing In Performance-Based Navigation 
With minimal effort, airlines will be able to take advantage of the most advantageous, curvaceous new NextGen procedures with their older-generation jets.
Search Continues For EgyptAir Fuselage, Flight Recorders 
The Egyptian military has deployed an autonomous submarine to assist a multinational contingent of aircraft and ships in finding the main wreckage of EgyptAir Flight MS 804.
Q400 Tire Blowout Investigation Highlights Regulation Gap 
Canada’s safety board warns that other aircraft types could be at risk of landing gear collapse because of a gap in certification regulations.
High-Altitude 'Upset Recovery' Renews Ice Crystal Interest 
Certification criteria for new aircraft include protecting against the ice crystal phenomena, the culprit in a significant number of incidents and accidents, but what about legacy aircraft?
EgyptAir Flight Disappears Amid Tourism Marketing Push  3

The disappearance of EgyptAir Flight MS 804 over the Mediterranean Sea early May 19 came as Egypt had begun making progress in shoring up international travel to the country.

FAA To Consider Certification For 'Special' Loadmasters 
In response to an NTSB recommendation, the FAA has launched an Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) to determine within two years whether the agency should create a certification for airline employees who supervise the loading, restraint and documentation of “special” cargo.
Training, Pitot Probes And Process Flaws Behind Boeing 757 Dive  65
While descending into Dublin during a flight from Newark, New Jersey, the crew of a United Airlines Boeing 757-200 acted in a “nonstandard” manner in responding to an unreliable airspeed indication—an issue most likely caused by ice crystals in the right-side pitot probe.
Panasonic to Enter Small UAS Market 
Electronics giant Panasonic Corp. is apparently developing a small, fixed-wing UAS (sUAS) for the commercial market.
Wasp Problem Forces Changes At Brisbane Airport, Etihad 
Within the space of 2 hr. 3 min. in November 2013, industrious mud-dauber wasps built a nest in the pilot-side pitot probe of an in-transit Etihad Airways Airbus A330 as it sat on the ground at Brisbane Airport in Australia.
Small UAS Methods For Track Inspections To Be Tested By Railway Company 
BNSF Railway Company this summer will test low-level surveillance methods necessary for beyond-visual line-of-sight operations for small unmanned air systems (sUAS), a critical capability in the company’s plans for autonomous unmanned track inspections.
Railway Company To Test sUAS Methods For Track Inspections 
BNSF Railway Company this summer will test low-level surveillance methods necessary for beyond-visual line-of-sight operations for small unmanned air systems (sUAS), a critical capability in the company’s plans for autonomous unmanned track inspections.
EasyJet, EASA Scrutinize EFB Performance Calculators 

European regulators and EasyJet are studying new approval and operational rules for electronic flight bags (EFBs) following a series of incidents involving takeoffs where pilots mistakenly set too little takeoff power.

100 Top Technologies: 'Tipping the Wing' to 'Printing the Future'  1
What technologies lie ahead for aerospace? Reusable spacecraft and additive manufacturing for sure, but what about flying cars, jetpacks or another attempt at nuclear-powered aircraft? Only the future will tell.​
 

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