Aviation Week & Space Technology

Podcast: What’s Coming In Rotorcraft?

Discuss this Video 18

on Mar 2, 2017

The turboprop comes of age.
There is no imperative to cruise at Mach 0.7.
240 Knots (Mach 0.4) is commercially viable.

on Mar 2, 2017

I have serious doubt that a complex machine as in a Tiltrotor, would be practical in an airline role. The mechanicals, rotating wings thrashing above your cabin, tilting complexity, and need for major re-training of ground crews, and A&Ps, will make this mode a risky venture that the average passenger will avoid, myself included.

on Mar 3, 2017

It's really not that complicated. Same engines, similar gear boxes, similar fuel systems, same equipment. It's like working Airbus all your life and then switching to Boeing. Sure, you have to train....but a pump is a pump, and an oil sump is an oil sump.

on Mar 2, 2017

Good luck for commercial operation. Safety is a big issue. How do you get FAA certification for engine out performance?

on Mar 3, 2017

Tiltrotors can operate quite safely on one engine. They have an interconnect shaft between pylons which can drive both rotors on one engine. As long as one engine spins, you get all the hydraulic, electrical, and propulsion power you need to land safely. If two engines fail, it will behave similar to any other aiframe with total power loss.

on Mar 2, 2017

Seems like I've been reading osprey problems since it was deployed. We don't have information on the recent "hard landing" in Yemen, but it adds to the list of worries. Lots of engineering going to be needed before commercial passengers will be allowed up in a tilt flyer.

on Mar 2, 2017

Why is it more efficient to have tilting wing on a tilt rotor that spends most of its time cruising? I would have thought that the advantage of reducing the effective negative lift from a non-tilting wing in hover was more critical for a vehicle that spent a lot of time in the hover.

Do you mean that the wing tilting mechanism becomes a smaller % of overall structural weight as the wingspan increases? Thus the weight penalty is less?

on Mar 2, 2017

Independently tilting the rotors and wing allows for some pretty spectacular super STOL capability. By tilting the wings up to about 30-40 deg and tilting the rotors to 60 - 70 deg you can greatly increase your lift-off weight with just a few hundred feet of runway.

on Mar 2, 2017

Hmmmm okay thanks

on Mar 2, 2017

Viable flying cars are finally here and will soon be commercially available by 2020. Once swarms of self-driving cars are clogging our roads, flocks of flying cars will be next to ease commuter travails. The sky is no limit.

on Mar 2, 2017

Sure Sure

on Mar 3, 2017

PAL-V is offered now in the US with flight training in Salt Lake and the Chinese e-hang 184 will be in operation in Dubai as an electric autonomous taxi later this year.

on Mar 2, 2017

Over the years, we have heard about the coming practicality of 'flying cars'. For myriad reasons, that has not happened. Those reasons are still viable, and adding in today's lifestyle of distracted driving, we have an impossibly toxic mix of barriers to ever having 'swarms of flying cars'.

on Mar 2, 2017

Putting aside high cost, inefficiencies and the worries of those who would rightly refuse to fly in one of these contraptions, we are left with a hybrid machine that really does nothing very well. In certain military roles perhaps the argument can be made for tilt rotors but when the bottom line is key, then surely not.
The size of the props needed to lift vertically become the wrong size for efficient forward flight.........a fundamental constraint in commercial aircraft. It's faster than a helicopter but way slower than a conventional feeder liner. So is that speed worth all that payload and cost benefits you give away? Probably not.

on Mar 3, 2017

hmmm.....a V-22 can dash above 300 KIAS. Name a commercial turboprop that can exceed that.

on Mar 3, 2017

I was comparing to an RJ.......the typical feeder liner these days. I concur on turboprop bit they've largely been replaced Stateside.

on Mar 3, 2017

Yes, an RJ would be a speed stretch for sure.

on Mar 16, 2017

what about the S-97?

it's a rotorcraft!

it should be possible to measure the distance between the rotors in flight - some variant on the hall effect or magnetometers. There would be some warning before the blades actually touched!

at any rate there's been no news for over a year

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