The U.S. Navy awarded Raytheon a contract modification this month for up to $254 million for development, test, and delivery of DDG-1000 Total Ship Computing Environment software for the Self Defense Test Ship, post-delivery availability, post-shakedown availability, SPY-3 volume search software and firmware development, as well as software maintenance on the DDG-1000.

The work is expected to be completed by January 2016. About $11 million will be provided upon contract award; those funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

Part of the work for the contract will include tweaks needed to enhance the SPY-3 radar’s ability to perform volume search missions. Initially, the Navy had planned a Dual–Band Radar (DBR) suite on the DDG-1000 Zumwalt destroyer.

With DBR, the service wanted to marry X- and S-band radars in a single, shipborne platform with a single processor to counter the latest missile and littoral threats using the Raytheon SPY-3 multifunction radar and the Lockheed volume search radar (VSR). The system would have operated with a combat system-supplied doctrine that effectively removes the need for an operator to run the radar, look at a radar display and make tactical decisions.

But as part of its new destroyer fleet plans, the Navy truncated the Zumwalt fleet to only three ships and eliminated the VSR as a cost-cutting move. To compensate, Raytheon began to work on modifications to its SPY-3 to provide some of the lost VSR capability.

“The SPY-3 volume search modification will be executed on the [recently awarded] contract and it is a software-only modification [with no change in hardware],” the Navy said in a statement. “The contract supports the required software qualification testing that will be performed by Raytheon.”

As noted in the recent Aviation Week Intelligence Network series “Come About,” Navy officials had built a special expensive testing facility for the Zumwalt DBR suite on the Virginia coast. With the program changes there is no more testing at that facility, Navy officials say, although there are plans to reopen for DBR testing for future carriers in the coming year.

Meanwhile, testing for the tweaked SPY-3 will be done on the Navy’s Self Defense Test Ship, as the recent contract indicates.

The contract also includes “the completion of software development for the DDG-1000-class destroyer program,” Raytheon notes, which includes “Total Ship Computing Environment Infrastructure integration, ship control systems, as well as associated Mission Systems Equipment software development and integration.”