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Discuss this Gallery 71

on Mar 25, 2016

And Burt Rutans veri-ez and Long -ez dont get a mention?!!!!

on Mar 25, 2016

My guess is because all of the aircraft presented were either commercial or military types, while Rutan's aircraft have been limited to private use.

on Nov 21, 2016

Why is AvWeek trying to pass a 10-month old article as a current story?
This is the lead today?

on Mar 25, 2016

That is a good question. And, yes, our focus was on designs that changed the way the industry builds aircraft. Rutan made it much easier for amateur homebuilders, but I am now sure how much influence his manufacturing methods had on the wider industry. Readers can weigh on on this and other choices.

on Mar 25, 2016

I'd definitely include the Varieze. It had an impact way beyond the numbers built by introducing a configuration AND a building technique to a much wider range of individuals almost any previous design. He wasn't the first with either, but it was definitely an iPad-esque moment for the homebuild movement (including me). Argueably it led to the composite kit industry. Gets my vote.
DC

on Mar 26, 2016

And the homebuilt scene isn't an industry?!!! Its worth over 4 Billion Dollars a year to the US economy alone. It employs countless professionals, has bought a whole new generation of people into aviation, both as pilots and builders. It has arguably inspired the likes of sirrus and others to take on the ageless cessnas and mooneys of the 60's with new designs, shapes and construction techniques based on the homebuilt market. Rutan pioneered the 'Lego Book' construction manual and mouldless composite construction for aviation amateurs, which has undoubtedly fed into the commercial side.
You could look at all rapid prototypes that have flown inthe last 20 years, many from Scaled Composites, all used the homebuilt philosophy and have had numerous technologies fed into production aircraft.

I think calling the homebuilt scene not part of the aerospace industry is naive and a little ill informed! Maybe that should be your next article... the effects of the homebuilt scene on the commercial industry and economy...

on Mar 25, 2016

Really new configurations are very rare, driven by a new requirement. For carrying large cargo containers inside the wing - span load - for maximum capacity the unique three wing configuration was necessary.
See Concordlift.com the configuration is patented and available. No fatal flaws have been found that it would not fly or would not be profitable.

on Mar 25, 2016

Thanks for the good laugh. Spam is rarely humorous. No flaws have been found? Maybe because no one has bothered to look at it. Too busy laughing.

on Mar 25, 2016

Just what is the a/c labeled as the '1931 – Budd BB-1 Pioneer'?

on Mar 25, 2016

Boeing 787 first flight was Dec. 15, 2009, not 2011 as stated in your article.

on Mar 25, 2016

Thanks for the correction

on Mar 25, 2016

As the brief makes clear, it is the later Budd RB-1 Conestoga, also made of steel. I could not find a contemporary image of the BB-1, although one is displayed at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia

on Nov 21, 2016

Pic of this one is here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budd_BB-1_Pioneer

on Mar 25, 2016

The Windecker Eagle, First All Composite airplane certified by the FAA and Its variant the YE-5 one of first stealth planes

on Mar 25, 2016

Seems to me that the Swiss Diamant all-compositesailplane was certified by the FAA in the late 1960's, sometime prior to to the 1969 certification of the Eagle?

on Mar 25, 2016

I would stand by the Windecker Eagle, as a powered aircraft, being the more significant, but here is what the FAA says:

"In 1965, the FAA type certified the first all-fiberglass aircraft in the normal category, a Swiss sailplane called a Diamant HBV. Four years later, the FAA certified a four-seat single-engine Windecker Eagle in the normal category."

The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum says:

"The Windecker Eagle I has the distinction of being the first all-composite aircraft to receive FAA certification."

on Mar 25, 2016

What about the Lancair line? All prepreg composites primary structure since the 80's.

on Mar 25, 2016

rWinter3 is correct, the significant aircraft is the Windecker Eagle, which is in the story, but not the gallery. It was the first FAA-certified all-composite aircraft. Lancairs. like Rutans, were designed for amateur builders

on Mar 25, 2016

I would like more information on the Dry Fiber Composite with Resin Transfer Infusion that is being used by Bombardier.

on Mar 25, 2016

Yeah that is really interesting. Conceptually it's straight forward, you have the fibers in an airtight mold with two holes, one leads to a vacuum pump and the other to the resin. The vacuum pump pulls the resin into the fiber, creating the matrix. But it is very very tricky to use, as I understand it the fibers often get caught at the boundary of the incoming resin, creating a lot areas with low fiber content. I'd be very interested to know how well that method is working out for them.

on Mar 25, 2016

The Mosquito is one of the most beautiful aircraft ever built.

on Mar 26, 2016

Absolutely correct!

I wish there were still some DH Hornets around. Sadly there's none extant. I think the Mosquito was the more beautiful of the two, but the Hornet apparently was an even better aircraft to fly according to a certain test pilot by the name of E. Brown.

on Mar 28, 2016

The Mosquito was beautiful, high-performance, and very versatile. Bomber, pathfinder, night fighter, photo-recon, and anti-shipping. It was so fast that few planes short of a jet could catch it. It was a spectacular airplane in so many ways.

on Oct 31, 2016

Wooden wonder, prodigy indeed. It was a handful to be flown, as our veterans recollected, but loved all the time. And also kind to lower forms of aviation life behind the Iron curtain - when unceremoniously scrapped in the fifties, Czechoslovak Mosquitoes (aka B-36! in the CzAF) provided, post mortem, reams of unavailable balsa wood to flying modellers' fraternity.

on Nov 23, 2016

The fact that it was made of wood, spruce, was a top secret. The Germans made the Me-410 to mimic the Mosquito in flying formations.

It was a very fast aircraft in those years, breaking speed records.

on Mar 25, 2016

Seriously disappointed by this article. No mention of the Lockheed Vega, any of Jack Northop's pioneering design, the B-2 which pioneered production techniques for composite aircraft structures (with a big Nod to Rutan), the first composite production biz-jet that predates the use of composite structures by Airbus (Rutan designed Starship), etc.

on Mar 25, 2016

I'm sorry to see a mainline site like Aviation Week lower itself by resorting to the clickbait format.

on Mar 25, 2016

The Lockheed Vega, Jack Northrop and the B-2 are mentioned in the article that goes with this gallery. Although a milestone, (and a marvel of design), the Starship was a dead-end in composites-manufacturing terms as Beechcraft quickly dropped the filament-winding process for automated fiber placement used in the Hawker 4000 and Premier 1 (both mentioned in the article). Rutan's manufacturing techniques worked well for homebuilts and rapid prototypes, but were never certified and used for series production, as far as I am aware.

on Mar 25, 2016

Actually, I need to correct myself - only the first Starship fuselage was filament-wound, it seems, then they switched to fiber-placement, which went on to become the industry standard. So perhaps I should have given the aircraft (which I happen to love) the credit it is due.

on Mar 25, 2016

The Mosquito was FAR more complex than 'plywood bonded to a balsa core'. Up to six different woods were used (including walnut and elm) with each being selected for its specific physical properties. The fuselage is best described as a composite structure as (in later production runs), gap-filling, water-resistant epoxy adhesives, such as Aerolite 303, were 'cured using the first application of RF heating to aircraft manufacture. With only 40% more wetted area than a Spitfire and twice the power, it became the fastest military aircraft in the world for more than 18 months in the middle of WW2. Lots more fascinating data (and WW2 colour film) on The People's Mosquito Ltd website, which shows building progress in New Zealand. The People's Mosquito is a UK Registered Charity, dedicated to rebuilding to flight status a de Havilland Mosquito, for the benefit of all. Full disclosure - I'm it's Director of Engineering. Oh, and we are actively seeking sponsors from within the aviation community! Sincerely, Ross Sharp

on Oct 31, 2016

Actually wood is the first, natural, composite ever - cellulose fibres (giving tensile strength) in a lignin matrix, resistant to compression. It knows no fatigue life, only rot is dangerous. Our designers were pretty adept at working with wood, and once the problems with the excess of aggresive hardeners (slowly attacking the (ply)wood once the fenolformaldehyde glues cured - see Focke Wulf Ta 154) were solved, the gliders and aircraft made of wood last forever. Back to grassroots and sustainable technology :-).

on Mar 25, 2016

I had only 90-100 words for each thumbnail, so I had to be economical with the facts, if hopefully not with the truth. So thank you for the insight! And good luck rebuilding that Mosquito.

on Mar 25, 2016

My pleasure. Sadly, we lost our much-beloved Patron, recently. Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown, RN was a giant in the fields of test flying and naval aviation. Feel free to drop by our site any time for updates!

on Mar 25, 2016

AW thank you thank you to browse those glory days of that odyssey!!

on Mar 25, 2016

Was looking at the pic of the C series. Beautiful bird. Hopefully its a more comfy airframe than the ones I occasionally fly to texas. Those old birds with the two out of sync mixmasters hanging on the aft fuselage remind me of the old Nightingales we used for USAF medevac and AirItalias versions. Gawd, the Italians could NEVER get the engines synced and it would drive us nuts on the flight from Brindisi to Rome and Frankfurt. Good times guys, good times.

on Mar 25, 2016

What abaut SR-71 ?

on Mar 25, 2016

The A-12 and SR-71 are mentioned in the accompanying article, but were not the first aircraft with titanium airframes

on Mar 25, 2016

it was the X-15

on Mar 25, 2016

The X3 flew in 1952, while the X15 in 1959, so was the first.
Very surprised that the Ruskie Ranter hasn't tried to claim that it was the Russians who invented the idea.

on Mar 28, 2016

The X-15 was built using Inconel X.

on Mar 25, 2016

As the gallery says, the first aircraft to use titanium in its structure was the Douglas X-3 first flown in 1952

on Mar 25, 2016

Shouldn't the Harrier be included here?

on Mar 25, 2016

I see now that the point of this article is materials of construction, not design.

on Mar 27, 2016

On the Avengers movies those stuffs are good but in real life useless piece of equipment!

on Mar 25, 2016

No Swing Wing planes on there?

on Mar 25, 2016

Other than the boron/expoxy doublers applied to strengthen the F-111 wing pivot fittings, I am not aware of any special advance in manufacturing that was required to enable variable-geometry wings. And this galley and associated story are about advances in manufacturing, not configuration

on Mar 26, 2016

Yeah you're right now that I think about it. The "Design" was revolutionary at the time, but not the built behind it.

on Nov 21, 2016

Hm... what about the wing box for the F-14? My reference article has sadly succumbed to link rot, but IIRC that construction was arguable one of the earliest large-scale uses of (what amounts to) 3D printing/additive manufacturing, and in titanium, no less -- a large inert gas-filled space building up the structure with titanium wire feed and electron beam welding, after which the rough workpiece was sent to be precision machined down to tolerance.
In fact, I believe Sciaky still uses the machine they created to build the F-14 wing boxes, and it still holds pride of place as having the largest build volume of any machine of its kind.

Hm... I can't seem to post URLs. But searching for Sciaky + F-14 + EBF3 will bring up some articles that mention the F-14 system in passing, along with the Design News article from Feb 12, 2013.
The May 2007 issue of "Welding Journal" (available online) goes into a great deal of depth about the use of Electron Beam Welding on the F-14 wing box, but doesn't mention EBF3 at all. Well, it's possible I'm misremembering the Design News article....

on Mar 27, 2016

The Conestoga was the subject of this apocryphal exchange:

"We learned a lot from that airplane."

"What did you learn?"

"We learned to not make airplanes that way."

on Nov 28, 2016

And the Budd Company went on to build the world famous moon buggies used at Dulles.

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