MRO Loses Tom Hendershot

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I just learned that Tom Hendershot died. Anyone who has met or spoken with him will probably remember his knowledge and love for the industry.

Tom, a recipient of the FAA’s Charles E. Taylor Master Mechanic award, had a long and distinguished aviation career as a pilot and mechanic.  

Here are a few paragraphs from a 2011 press release about him: Hendershot worked his way as a mechanic through flight school, eventually becoming Chief Flight Instructor at General Aviation at Lost Nation Airport in Willoughby, Ohio. During that time he was also part owner and Vice President of Operations for Air-Motive Specialties Inc. at the Willoughby airport. In the late 1990s, he took a position with Frontier Airlines Inc. as a Quality Assurance Inspector, Maintenance Instructor, and Director of the AMT Program starting in 1999. Under his leadership, Frontier Airlines Inc. became the first FAR 121 certificated airline to receive the FAA Diamond of Excellence Award, and did so for nine consecutive years.

In January 2007, he assumed the role of Executive Director of AMTSociety. He currently serves on the boards of various industry associations including National Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT), Aviation Technical Education Council (ATEC), National Business Aircraft Association (NBAA) Maintenance Committee, Redstone College, Northrop-Rice Foundation Executive Board (NRF), Joint Service Aviation Maintenance Technician Certification Council (JSAMTCC), Aviation Regulatory Advisory Council FAR 147, Chairman Emily Griffith Opportunity School for Aviation Denver Public Schools System, Chairman FAA/Industry General Aviation Awards Program Advisory Board, and Chairman of the FAA National Aviation Maintenance Technician of the Year Selection Committee, part of the General Aviation Awards Program.

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