More on no F-35s


Stewart Webb, whom I mentioned in my earlier post about Canada's withdrawal from the F-35 program and whom I wasn't able to call at the time because it was too early in British Columbia (!), just sent me the following reaction to the news:

"The government has withheld the KPMG report for over a week now. The leak of withdrawing from the F35 decision shows that the government is finally understanding the predicament it cornered itself into and that the aircraft will not be some technological "magic bullet" wonder that our government has portrayed. It has been a controversy since the beginning, including the press conference announcing the decision with an F35 mock-up that cost the taxpayer over $40,000. The government will now have to undertake an open competition which might have an impact on the decisions of other countries." 

Too true. How will this impact other wavering countries, notably smaller, northern European ones?




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