More headaches for Qantas - UPDATED

There is no word yet on what sort of ongoing schedule issues will result from the wing-to-wing collision between a Qantas Boeing 747-400 and an Airbus A380 in Los Angeles late on Feb. 27.

Both affected flights were canceled, and presumably Qantas will face some scheduling challenges while the damage is repaired. The carrier operates 12 A380s on its international trunk routes, and 15 747s. The incident occurred shortly after the carrier announced that it will be deferring remaining A380 orders and accelerating the retirement of its 747s, as part of a wider range of cuts (subscribers only).

According to the airline, the wing tips of the two Qantas aircraft came into contact at approximately 9 pm local time while being towed out of the hangar in Los Angeles. No passengers were on board.

The Feb. 27 QF94 (LAX-MEL) and QF16 (LAX-BNE) services were both canceled.

UPDATE - Qantas says the 747 has already been flown back to Australia, and the A380 will be "coming back shortly" too.

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