Before most people noticed, the idea of employing aircraft in the national airspace without pilots aboard them -- unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs (and sometimes UAS, where the S is for "systems") -- has gotten to a point where their introduction is considered inevitable. Who'd have thought? After all, these machines were originally developed to conduct military missions in areas deemed too hazardous for humans, not for ordinary flying tasks. Advocates like to say UAVs are best at "3-D ...


You must be a paid subscriber to access "UAVs, or Nothing Can Go Wrong, Go Wrong. . .".


Current Aviation Week Intelligence Network (AWIN) enterprise and individual members: please go to for access.


Not currently a subscriber? Click on the "Learn More" button below to view subscription offers.

Already registered? here.