The Pentagon and Lockheed Martin have finally agreed to share the cost of modifications for roughly 30 aircraft to be procured in the next lot of F-35 production. The question of who would pay for the so-called concurrency costs—the cost of retrofitting fixes to problems discovered during the program’s testing on already-built aircraft—has been the subject of a hearty debate between the parties this year. Lockheed executives have said before that the amount of cost-sharing on concurrency ...

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