City: Dubai

Country: United Arab Emirates

Status: Major UAE financial center

Country visa requirement: Transit visas good for seven days can be obtained on arrival for passengers holding valid passports from Canada, the U.S. and Mexico; the European Union and most other non-E.U. nations on the Continent; Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia; passengers from other countries must apply for visas in advance. Visits longer than seven days require visas issued prior to arrival. Operating crewmembers with valid passports and crew IDs do not require visas. (Relief crewmembers arriving via airline are treated as passengers.) Crew IDs must be hard-plastic laminated (airport-issued IDs not acceptable) and include company name, expiration date and crew position. Crewmembers also must be uniformed. If any of these requirements are not met, crewmembers will not be permitted entry into the UAE.

Landing permit requirement: Yes; minimum two business days required for application.

Sponsor letter required: No

Aircraft documents required: Standard documentation, e.g., airworthiness certificate, aircraft registration, insurance certificate with country coverage, etc.

Any other requirements for visiting aircraft: No

Carbon trading requirement: No

ATC procedures: ICAO

Any unique procedures: No

Altimetry: QNH

Metric or feet: Feet

RVSM: Yes

WGS 84-compliant: Yes

Local navigator required: No

Airport 1Name & ICAO identifier: Dubai International Airport (OMDB)

Coordinates: 25° 15.2' N, 55° 21.9' E

POE: Yes

Elevation: 60 ft.

Runways: 12L/30R, 13,123 ft. x 197 ft., asphalt (PCN: 122FBXE); 12R/30L, 13,123 ft. x 197 ft., asphalt (PCN: 065FBXU)

Slots: Yes

Noise restrictions: No

Curfew: No

FBOs: Execujet Aviation Group, Executive Flight Center, Jet Aviation

Clear CIQ at: FBOs

Parking: At FBOs, if ramp space is available; otherwise remotely on the airport, requiring considerable taxi time during periods of congestion.

Hangarage: Yes

Fuel: Jet-A1

Credit: Fuel cards

Maintenance: Yes, most business jet types

Lav service: Yes

Catering: Emirates Airlines or local hotels (the latter highly rated for catering)

Fees: Runway fees claimed to be “reasonable.”

Security: Rated excellent.

Ground transportation: All types

Distance and driving time to downtown: 2 sm/3 km

Airport 2Name & ICAO identifier: Dubai Al Maktoum International Airport (OMDW)

Coordinates: 24° 55.1' N, 55° 10.5' E

POE: Yes

Elevation: 170 ft.

Runways: 12/30, 14,764 ft. x 197 ft., asphalt. (When this airport, which is linked into an intermodal transportation system involving the Dubai seaport and a superhighway connecting the two, is completed, it is projected to be the world's largest airport, featuring five parallel runways of equal length oriented 12/30 and separated by 2,600 ft.)

Slots: No

Noise restrictions: No

Curfew: No

FBOs: Aviation Services Management

Clear CIQ at: FBO

Parking: FBO; no parking issues at the present time, as airport is in development.

Hangarage: Yes

Fuel: Jet-A1

Credit: Yes, fuel cards

Maintenance: No; available at Dubai International

Lav service: Yes

Catering: Arranged by FBO, as most hotels are located in downtown Dubai.

Fees: Vary

Security: Rated excellent.

Ground transportation: All types

Distance and driving time to downtown: 22 sm/35 km

Airport 3Name & ICAO identifier: Sharjah International Airport (OMSJ)

Coordinates: 25° 19.7' N, 55° 31' E

POE: Yes

Elevation: 111 ft.

Runways: 12/30, 13,330 ft. x 197 ft., asphalt (PCN: 056FAXU)

Slots: No

Noise restrictions: No

Curfew: No

FBOs: No; VIP lounge at passenger terminal and handling agencies located in Sharjah Free Trade Zone next to terminal.

Clear CIQ at: Passenger terminal

Parking: Terminal area; no issues involving parking.

Hangarage: No

Fuel: Jet-A1

Credit: Fuel cards

Maintenance: No; available at Dubai International.

Lav service: Yes

Catering: Arranged via handler.

Fees: Vary

Security: Rated good

Ground transportation: All types

Distance and driving time to downtown: 8 sm/13 km; avoid rush hours, if possible, as traffic congestion can cause lengthy delays.

BCA appreciates the assistance of Skyplan International in the preparation of this report.

It could be argued that the competition among oil-rich Persian Gulf nations to outdo one another with ever-larger public works and private-sector projects has reached its zenith in Dubai.

The city, poised on the northern shore of the Musandam Peninsula (that separates the Persian Gulf from the Gulf of Oman, barely 100 sm from Iran across the Strait of Hormuz), currently boasts both the highest building and what may become the largest airport in the world. The former, of course, is the minaret-like Burj Khalifa (star of the latest “Mission Impossible” film), at 2,722 ft., nearly 1,000 ft. higher than New York's 1 World Trade Center tower. And the latter, as yet not as well known outside the United Arab Emirates (UAE), is Al Maktoum International Airport, which when completed, will feature five parallel runways measuring nearly 15,000 ft. each.

Both of these edifices are emblematic of the economic course that Dubai's government has chosen to navigate the emirate away from oil revenues and into real estate and construction, tourism, shipping and high finance. The reason: Its proven oil reserves are expected to be depleted within 20 years. Currently, oil accounts for only 7% of Dubai's revenues. Al Maktoum International Airport, for example, is being developed as part of an intermodal transportation system and is linked via a new highway with Dubai's seaport. While the original conception for the airport has been scaled back since the 2008 recession and the field remains uncompleted, the facility will serve primarily as an air cargo shipping and receiving point. In the meantime, Dubai International Airport (OMDB) remains the city's primary field.

Dubai, of course, is both a city and one of the seven emirates constituting the UAE federation. The city's population stands at approximately 3.8 million people, only 19% of whom are UAE citizens, the remainder (as in Qatar) being expatriates from other countries. Its now-diversified economy is a magnet attracting international business, foreign investment and tourism, the last accounting for the rocketing growth of Dubai-based Emirates Airlines (on its way to being one of the largest carriers in the world) and elevating Dubai International Airport to 15th busiest in the world.