Sean Broderick

Sean Broderick
Managing Editor, MRO,
Aviation Week Intelligence Network

Sean Broderick's aviation career started in 1991, working for Airbus in Toulouse. His industry experience includes four years with an aviation consultancy, where he worked on the successful launch of a U.S. Part 121 carrier; 12 years with an airport association as a magazine editor and communications executive; and more than 15 years of full- and part-time work as a journalist for Aviation Week writing primarily about maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) and safety. He graduated from James Madison University with a B.S. in Communications ('91) and earned an M.S. in Integrated Marketing Communications ('13) from West Virginia University.

Articles
Rockwell Collins Granted FAA STC For 757/767 Cockpit Upgrade 
FAA has granted Rockwell Collins an initial supplemental type certificate (STC) for the company’s 757/767 flight deck display retrofit, the company reports.
Rolls Banks On Innovation, Savings To Boost Trent 500 

A decade of rising fuel prices and the emergence of better big twins has the Airbus A340 on the ropes. Yet of all the model’s supposed weaknesses, manufacturer  complacency is not one.

Airbus and its engine suppliers are positioning newer A340s as viable options for both second-tier operators and bigger carriers waiting to take newer, more efficient widebodies. Arguably the most aggressive has been the company with a reputation for being inflexible: Rolls-Royce.

May Cargo Figures Trigger Cautious Optimism 
Wavering cargo demand over the last few months solidified in May, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) says, posting increases in every geographic region and providing hope that pessimistic views of the next 12 months may be premature.
2013 Enplanements Concentrated At Fewer Airports, FAA Figures Show 
U.S. passenger boardings were up slightly in 2013 but were shared among fewer airports, FAA’s preliminary data show, reflecting the continued fallout of mainline carriers parking less fuel-efficient regional jets and cutting flights even as they keep capacity in check.
 
U.S. airports enplaned 739.3 million passengers last year, FAA’s first-cut tally shows. The figure is about 1% higher than 2012’s final figure of 732.9 million.
2013 Enplanements Concentrated At Fewer Airports, FAA Figures Show 
U.S. passenger boardings were up slightly in 2013 but were shared among fewer airports, FAA’s preliminary data show, reflecting the continued fallout of mainline carriers parking less fuel-efficient regional jets and cutting flights even as they keep capacity in check.
EU Signals OppositionTo Unilateral FAA Drug/Alcohol Testing Rule 

Drug and alcohol testing requirements for foreign repair stations under consideration by FAA should not override bilaterals that call for joint negotiations when changing issues covered in the agreements, the European Commission (EC) says.

EU Signals OppositionTo Unilateral FAA Drug/Alcohol Testing Rule 
Responding to FAA’s request for feedback on a possible mandate, the EC’s Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport Director Matthew Baldwin points to the 2011 U.S.-EU Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA).
Convergence Of Flight Path Analyses Shapes New MH370 Search Area 4
Newly defined search area for MH370 is based on convergence of analyses that combine revised assumptions and few known data points.
More Strategic Aftermarket Partnerships Coming, Republic Exec Says 

WASHINGTON — U.S. carriers trail many foreign competitors in creating a supply chain focused on strategic partnerships, but the continuing drive to cut costs will lead to greater adoption of the approach--and increase pressure on suppliers, Republic Airways Holdings VP-Supply Chain Andrew Skaff predicts.

New Timco Line Stations Boost Offerings To Haeco Customers 

Timco, strengthening a core business line and broadening its offerings to its customers as well as those of parent Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company Ltd. (Haeco), has added line stations at Anchorage Ted Stevens International (ANC) and San Francisco International (SFO) airports.

The new stations boost Timco’s total to 18, but only one of its other locations—Seattle—is considered an international gateway to Asia. 

Latest Blogs
Jul 21, 2014
blog

Belgian Leopards Given Royal Farewell

Belgium celebrated its independence day July 21 with four Leopard 1A5 tanks ending the military part of the traditional parade in front of the Royal Palace in Brussels....More
Jul 21, 2014
blog

UPDATE: DigitalGlobe's Before and After Images of MH17 Crash Site 6

U.S. commercial imagery provider DigitalGlobe posts electro-optical images of eastern Ukraine's Donetsk region....More
Jul 21, 2014
blog

Social Quiz Day 7: Can you name the tool?

Another tool spotted at Aviation Week’s MRO Americas 2014 exhibition. What is it?...More
Jul 18, 2014
blog

Social Quiz Day 6: Can you name the aviation system?

Another aviation system spotted at Aviation Week’s MRO Americas 2014 exhibition. What is it?   Email your answer to Regina.Kenney@aviationweek.com by 1:00pm CT on July 20 and all correct answers will be put in a drawing to win Aviation Week stylus. (#6 of #7)  ...More
Jul 18, 2014
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Check 6 Podcast: Malaysia Flight MH17 Shootdown 6

Our editors discuss why MH17 was flying over a war zone when it was shot down....More
Jul 17, 2014
blog

Learn More About Sbirs and DSP -- Satellites Attributed with Seeing the MH17 Shootdown 1

The U.S. Space-Based Infrared System (Sbirs) and its predecessor Defense Support Program satellites are getting a lot of attention because of the tragic crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, allegedly shot down over Eastern Ukraine July 17....More

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