By Ross Detwiler

By Ross Detwiler
Articles
How to Recover from Tailplane Icing 38
Successfully coping with tailplane icing requires an understanding of the aerodynamics of your aircraft and how the wing and tailplane work together.
Aviation Computers Part II 

When people who know me learn that I'm writing about computers, they smile, shake their heads and say, “This should be cute.” Those who don't know me would surmise that anyone this old and beat up can't have much to teach about the technology. A big "Thank You" to both groups.

Flying the Oceans, a 7X Shakedown 

There’s an allure to flying long distances over deep water.

The Wingman 

``UDORN, BUICK, TAXI with four Phantoms.''

Christmas season 1972 continued. Udorn, Thailand. We of ``Buick'' flight begin to roll. Despite our broadcast, Buick is really a two-ship flight. Linebacker 2, the ongoing bombardment of North Vietnam, has been tough on our fighter wing and we've got too many F-4s in maintenance. Today I'm lead, nickname ``Rosie.'' My good friend, ``Wheels'' is two, my backseater, Danny, is answering as three and ``Buf'' in the back of Wheels' airplane is four.

We hope our subterfuge will fool the commies.

From Buenas Noches to Manana 

I've been flying Dassault Falcon Jets for more than 30 years, and have enjoyed every model, beautiful machines all. My flight department's current king is the Global Express, and while I am impressed with the comfort and range of the Bombardier jet, it nettled me to think our Falcon 900EX might be regarded as wanting in terms of its reach. I watched our mission board, waiting for just the right trip to set the record straight.

Fuels Rush In The amount of fuel aboard at departure is a constant consideration in all long-range operations. 

Ever been in this situation? It's about 45 minutes before scheduled takeoff. This is going to be a long ride. Cairo back to Washington, D.C., or Tokyo back to New York. You ran the flight plan for the entire week before you left and, if the weather holds, it's doable. You will arrive at destination with just enough fuel for NBAA reserves. The tanks are just about full. Fifteen hundred pounds more and you'll be set for the long ride home as Capt. Hero, making one of the longest nonstops in recent corporate history.

Then the fuel truck shuts off.

For the Troops: Report #9 

IN THE TORRID JULY HEAT of 1969, 250 grunts at a Special Forces camp in South Vietnam were eating dust and awaiting an air show in the form of two F-100 Super Sabres on an ``LZ Prep'' to create a helicopter landing zone (LZ) half a mile away.

Some LZ Prep basics: Take a 750-pound bomb, fit the front with a 36-inch pipe ``extender'' and an instantaneous fuse, and drop it into the jungle. When the bomb explodes, its casing mostly above the ground, lots of lumber gets moved.

A Pacific Round Robin 

Sounds like a chief pilot trip to me,'' said our scheduler. ``Honolulu, Sydney, Tokyo and home with 45 hours of flying time and only out of the office for four work days.''

These guys are always looking out for me.

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