Paul Seidenman

Paul Seidenman
Articles
Southwest Evaluating 737 Avionics Upgrades 

For Southwest Airlines, there are no replacement plans—at least for now—for the electromechanical cockpits on the 130 Boeing 737-300s and -500s it still flies.

“We are always evaluating the future of our 737-300s and -500s, which includes possible cockpit modifications as fleet planning warrants,” says Kent Horton, Southwest's director of engineering.

NextGen, Obsolescence Driving Avionics Refurbs
Parts scarcity and evolving ATM requirements push airlines to modernize cockpits
Southwest 737 Classics Experience Avionics Reliability Issues 

Southwest Airlines is beginning to run up against reliability, parts obsolescence and supply challenges with the attitude display indicator (ADI) on the 737 Classic fleet, says Kent Horton, Southwest’s director of engineering.

Southwest Faces 737 Classics Avionics Problems
Despite reliability and spare parts issues, Southwest does not have any plans—at least for now—to replace the electro-mechanical cockpits on the 130 Boeing 737-300s and -500s it still flies. (Image: Southwest)
CFM56-5B To Drive Biggest MRO Engine Growth 

Analysts tracking the commercial aircraft turbine engine MRO market see a growth period for the industry from 2014 through 2023, although at a percentage rate in the low-to-mid-single digits.

According to data generated by Aviation Week analysts, the global value of the engine MRO market for 2014 is estimated at $20.3 billion, based on the in-service engine fleet of 63,000 for that year—including 3,952 new deliveries. Some aviation industry analysts project slightly higher numbers for the same period.

Investments In Engine Technology Help To Cut Fuel Burn
Fuel savings, durability are behind enhanced powerplant repairs
Digital Technology Drives Maintenance Documentation 

The proliferation of mobile devices and software that enables increasingly more complex data distribution and handling could lead to the most significant evolution in maintenance documents management since the transition from paper to electronic formats.

Boeing Launching Line Maintenance Applications For Mobile Devices 

Boeing this fall will launch a line maintenance applications suite for mobile devices with an unidentified customer, following a year of development.

“Airlines are using more mobile technology every day, and the mobile platform is an ideal tool for mechanics to have the information when and where they need it, and to share that information with other experts or departments across the company,” says Elizabeth Holleman, a representative for Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Digital Aviation Business, in Renton, Wash.

Boeing Launching Line Maintenance Apps For Mobile Devices 
Boeing will launch a line maintenance applications suite for mobile devices this fall with an unnamed customer, following a year in development.
Airframers’ NextGen Support Plans Go Beyond What Earlier Models Received 

Airframe OEMs are seeing new business opportunities and aftermarket revenue streams for their next generation of commercial jets, but customer support will not be business as usual.

Airbus Targets Aggressive A350 Maintenance Plan
Airbus is targeting a 10% reduction in direct maintenance costs compared to the Boeing 787-9
737 MAX MRO Builds On Existing Infrastructure
When the first Boeing 737 MAX jets are delivered, operators should benefit from new technologies built on a derivative airframe.
OEMs Offer New Generation Support For Next-Gen Jets
Airframe OEMs' support plans for next-gen jets go beyond what earlier models received
Airlines, Engine MROs Collaborate On Customized Support Plans 

As airlines continue to watch engine expenses, MROs are being asked by their customers to design customized approaches to service and provide material solutions. The conversation is forcing MRO vendors to search for answers outside their facilities.

Airlines Seek Greater Personalized Engine Support 

As airlines continue to watch engine expenses, MROs are being asked by their customers to design customized approaches to service and provide material solutions. The conversation is forcing MRO vendors to search for answers outside their facilities.“A decade ago, the focus of engine maintenance contracts was on supporting the customer—at the time of the shop visit,” says Kristin Kenny, director of Pay Per Hour Programs for Pratt & Whitney Canada. “Now, contracts must be structured to take into account a complete understanding of the customer's operation.”

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