Pat Toensmeier

Pat Toensmeier
Articles
Simulator Allows Accurate Testing Of Infantry Equipment 

The days of front-loading equipment programs with costly prototypes and field trials may be over—at least if a simulator developed by Chemring Technology Solutions (CTS) gains wide acceptance for research and development initiatives.

The U.K.-based company, whose focus is defense and security technologies, recently developed the Dismounted Close Combat (DCC) simulator, which provides a fully immersive environment for preliminary testing of concepts and prototypes.

Marines Practice Shooting On Moving Robots 

One problem in war is that enemies do not stand still to be dispatched with one shot. Hence, the importance of hitting moving targets. Rifle practice in this area, though, is rare—even the U.S. Marine Corps falls short. This could be changing, however. The Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory (MCWL) tested techniques for accurately engaging moving targets last month in Quantico, Va. Marines fired M-4 carbines and M-27 infantry automatic rifles at life-size plastic mannequins on tracked robots moving at 4-8 mph.

Alloy Increases Thermocouple Heat Resistance In Jets 

A thermocouple developed at Cambridge University in England to measure jet engine temperatures near their combustion source reduces drift by 80% at 1,200C (2,192F), and 90% at 1,300C. Drift is degradation in a sensor, typically a double-walled nickel-based thermocouple in this application, which monitors engine heat. High temperature affects the integrity of components and thus, engine maintenance and life. Most nickel-based thermocouples drift above 1,000C. This is a problem because many engines reach 1,500C.

Navy Seeks Onboard System To Predict Resupply Conditions 

The U.S. Navy wants to develop an onboard sensor that provides ships engaged in resupply at sea forecasts of environmental conditions, wave motions and ship movements such as pitch, heave and roll. The objective is to base materiel transfer decisions on the best available data to increase safety and efficiency. A research partnership of industry and academia, led by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Div., tested hardware and software last month for the Environmental and Ship Motion Forecasting (ESMF) system.

U.S. Gains Needed Capacity Of Critical Metal 

The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory recently announced the success of an initiative with industry to restore adequate amounts of domestically manufactured primary beryllium metal. The primary or high-purity beryllium is produced at a reduction plant in Elmore, Ohio, operated by Brush Wellman. Access to a reliable domestic supply of primary beryllium, which is processed into “pebbles” for use in high-tech applications, is vital to U.S. defense. Beryllium is one of the lightest metals on Earth and six times stiffer than steel.

Enhancing Bolt-Action Rifles 

No matter how advanced a bolt-action rifle is, it represents 19th-century technology, says Bret Boyd, vice president of sales and marketing at TrackingPoint Inc., a company that is using 21st-century technology to make this type of weapon far more accurate.

Nuclear Blasts Can’t Hide From Radio Telescopes 

In the future, if a rogue nation is caught secretly testing a nuclear weapon, and is confronted with credible evidence about blast size, location, date and time of detonation, satellites and radio telescopes may get the credit. Researchers at Ohio State University and astronomers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have discovered that GPS and GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) satellites, along with the Very Large Array (VLA) of 27 radio telescopes in New Mexico, can detect atmospheric disturbances caused by nuclear blasts.

Ceramic Materials Supplant Conventional Armor Plates 

Ceramic materials have become viable—even better—replacements for conventional metallic armor plates on tanks, personnel carriers and other armored vehicles. They not only resist penetration by most explosive projectiles encountered on a battlefield, but provide considerable weight savings, which in turn increase the agility and maneuverability of these multi-ton platforms. Ceramic plates, however, have one significant problem: weakness in the adhesive bond that connects them to their composite backing material, which reduces their effectiveness.

HMX The Latest In Military Energetics 

NEW YORK – The state-of-the-art in military energetics is HMX, a powerful material that is dense, thermodynamically stable and low in sensitivity — in other words, a devastating explosive that is safe to handle. Research by the University of Michigan and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) indicates that the explosiveness of HMX can be increased with no trade-off in sensitivity, by combining it with an energetic known as CL-20, which while powerful, is by itself too sensitive for use.

HMX The Latest In Military Energetics 
The state-of-the-art in military energetics is HMX, a powerful material that is dense, thermodynamically stable and low in sensitivity — in other words, a devastating explosive that is safe to handle.
Boom Times In Military Explosives 

The state-of-the-art in military energetics is HMX, a powerful material that is dense, thermodynamically stable and low in sensitivity—in other words, a devastating explosive that is safe to handle.

Research by the University of Michigan and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) indicates that the explosiveness of HMX can be increased with no trade-off in sensitivity by combining it with an energetic known as CL-20, which while powerful, is by itself too sensitive for use.

Prospects Dim For Business Travel In U.S., Europe Next Year
Primarily cause continues to be persistence of economic downturn.
MAG Uses Cryogenics To Reduce Machining Costs 

As contractors make greater use of composites and high-strength metals in aircraft structures, attention is focusing on ways of improving manufacturing productivity and reducing per-part cost. One technique to emerge for the machining of parts is cryogenic cooling, which can increase machining speed, reduce cutting force, extend cutting tool life, and lower the time and cost required to finish components.

Network Security In The Cloud 

As more users adopt cloud-based computing networks to achieve bandwidth efficiency, hardware reduction and other benefits, issues arise over the ability to access different operating systems in the cloud, host multiple domains, assure data resilience and, importantly, maintain security. Three companies have partnered to develop a system that they say is innovative in that it provides a secure, scalable, redundant platform for cloud networks in sensitive environments, including tactical military use.

Technologies Evolving To Cloak Battlefield Vehicles From Sensors
The ultimate stealth protection for anything on or over a battlefield would be the ability to disappear from view.
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May 22, 2015
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May 10, 2015
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Ethiopian Airlines Takes Delivery Of Newest 737-800

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