Mark Carreau

Mark Carreau
Space Contributor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Mark is based in Houston, where he has written on aerospace for more than 25 years. While at the Houston Chronicle, he was recognized by the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement Foundation in 2006 for his professional contributions to the public understanding of America's space program through news reporting. He has written on U. S. space policy as well as NASA's human and space science initiatives.
 
Mark was recognized by the Texas Associated Press Managing Editors and Headliners Foundation as well as the Chronicle in 2004 for news coverage of the shuttle Columbia tragedy and its aftermath.
 
He is a graduate of the University of Kansas and holds a Master's degree in Journalism and Mass Communications from Kansas State University.
 
 

Articles
Curiosity Confirms Martian Methane, Elusive Soil-Based Organics 
The lingering mystery over Martian methane and the possibility of a microbial origin persists, though with a new urgency based on ground-level measurements from NASA’s Curiosity rover.
U.S. Astronaut Up For Challenge Of Year On ISS 
The challenge of a one-year stay aboard the International Space Station eventually became appealing to NASA astronaut Scott Kelly.
NASA’s JPL Reports Laser Communications Milestones 
NASA’s experiment with space laser communications from the International Space Station, initiated in mid-2014, so far shows promise as a technology that could replace the traditional use of radio waves for accelerated high data transmissions from deep space probes as well as Earth orbiting satellites.
Morpheus Closes Successful Planetary Lander Flight Test Campaign 

HOUSTON – NASA is closing out the flight phase of project Morpheus following a final encore ascent and descent of the four-legged, methane-fueled prototype planetary lander onto a simulated lunar scape at Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 15.

Morpheus Closes Successful Planetary Lander Flight Test Campaign 
NASA will close out the test flight phase of project Morpheus, a 4 1/2-year, $14.5 million effort to develop precision automated terminal landing technologies for future human and robotic planetary missions, following a final encore ascent and descent of the four-legged, methane-fueled prototype lander.
NASA Considered Best Employer Among Federal Workers 
For the third year in a row, NASA is perched atop the rankings as the best place to work in the U.S. federal government, according to a 2014 survey.
Orion Flight Test Generated 200 GB Of Engineering Data 5
Data from the Orion flight test—recorded at much higher rates than the normal 1-Hz used operationally so engineers can pinpoint the changes in loads and other factors during the flight—will be used to validate models and improve designs.
NASA’s Robonaut Gets Operating Room Checkout 
A mechanical sibling of NASA’s Robonaut-2, the unofficial seventh member of the International Space Station’s crew, demonstrated new terrestrial skills at Texas Medical Center this week.
Orion’s ‘Trial By Fire’ Delivers Data For Final Design 

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER/JOHNSON SPACE CENTER — NASA’s new Orion crew capsule flew its first test in space with clocklike precision Friday, using two unmanned orbits that took it deeper into space than any human spacecraft has gone since Apollo 17 before a bull’s-eye splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

Recent Martian Meteorite May Host Organics Of Biological Origin 

HOUSTON – A multinational research team reports evidence of organic material of biological origin within the crevices of a fragment from  Tissint, a more than 26-lb. meteorite of Martian origin that was witnessed falling into Morocco on July 18, 2011 and recovered just three months later.

The analysis by French, Chinese, German and Japanese researchers raises anew the debate over whether Mars, now cold, dry and with a thin atmosphere rich in CO2, was once suitable for microbial life.

Deep Space Cosmic Rays Draw Concern From Human Spaceflight Experts 
Just as the U.S. begins to assemble and flight test spacecraft components for a new era of human deep space exploration, the deep space radiation environment is growing more hazardous, according to a recent study.
Orion’s ‘Trial By Fire’ Delivers Data For Final Design 39
NASA’s new Orion crew capsule flew its first test in space with clocklike precision Friday, using two unmanned orbits that took it deeper into space than any human spacecraft has gone since Apollo 17 before a bull’s-eye splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.
 
Blogs
Dec 22, 2014
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Emergency Festive Bookshelf Ideas

Facing a last minute book idea emergency? If you are ready to scramble, here are a couple of last minute suggestions....More
Dec 18, 2014
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Fly to Cuba?

Will restored diplomatic relations between Cuba and the U.S. open travel and aviation aftermarket opportunities?...More
Dec 18, 2014
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SpaceX Slips ISS Cargo Run To Early January 1

Company opts to conduct second Falcon 9 static fire test before launch....More

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