Kent S. Jackson

Kent S. Jackson
Articles
Charter Broker Rules Hold Operators Responsible For Broker Misdeeds  1
New U.S. Transportation Department transparency requirements may result in delays or stranded charter passengers.
Navigating Rules For Personal Flights In The Company Aircraft 
Flight departments must walk a narrow path to satisfy all regulatory requirements.
UAS (Drone) Regulations  1
Tired of climbing into a cramped cockpit and contending with cumulonimbus and demanding passengers? Why not instead don a pair of fuzzy slippers, settle into a recliner and become a remote pilot in command?
Aircraft Tracking: Who Is Watching You? 
There is a growing awareness and concern that those who have asked that ATC tracking data be blocked from dissemination on the Internet are now subject to exposure through growing networks that capture their Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) transmissions. Today, there are thousands of tracking capture sites receiving data from unwitting operators.
Point of Law: FAR Part 91 Maintenance Programs 1

There are two maintenance questions that are posed to me again and again: First, “Are Mandatory Service Bulletins really mandatory?” and its counterpart: “When the manufacturer updates the maintenance program, do I have to comply with the changes?”

Selling a Plane ‘As Is, Where Is’

Selling a used jet “As Is, Where Is, With All Faults” is an age-old practice. It is the plain English version of caveat emptor: Let the buyer beware.

The tradition in aviation is that the seller allows the buyer to inspect the airplane prior to purchase. The buyer pays for the inspection. The seller pays to repair the airworthiness discrepancies found. The shop “returns the aircraft to service” and the buyer flies it home.

What Is ‘Careless or Reckless?’ 3

Quote from a 1986 enforcement case: “As Hogan Air Flight 816 taxied on Taxiway ‘C’ and passed by the Guard ramp area, the cadets observed you abandon your position in the left seat, stand up, remove your trousers, slide the window open and expose your buttocks.”

Forecast 2014: Charter Brokers in the Spotlight 

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) published a long-awaited Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) entitled “Enhanced Consumer Protections for Charter Air Transportation” on Sept. 30, 2013, and then the federal government promptly shut down.

Serving Up Liability 

Earlier this year on a red-eye flight from China, I had the pleasure of sitting next to a highly intoxicated and unusually talkative German. As the sun rose and breakfast was served, the flight attendant cheerfully passed him another Guinness. He was happy. She was happy. I was not. Was the FAA?

Anatomy of a Tax Audit 

The political math is not complicated. The U.S. government and most of the states are broke. Most people don't own aircraft. So, there won't be a populist revolt if in their quest for more revenue the IRS and counterparts at the state level target business aircraft for audits.

Sales Smarts 

The market adage, “Don't try to catch the falling knife,” was born of hard experience. But in the used aircraft world, the knife seems to have finally hit the floor, and buyers are gradually emerging from the shadows of recession. There is no doubt that buyers and sellers are wary now, but are they smarter?

ASAP For Everyone 

An Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP) is a reporting program that allows employees of participating air carriers and repair station certificate holders to identify and report safety issues to management and to the FAA for resolution, without fear that the FAA will use reports accepted under the program to take legal enforcement action against them, or that companies will use such information to take disciplinary action.

Aircraft Finance 

Rumors of the death of aircraft finance were greatly exaggerated. Aircraft finance is still around. Like everything else in the industry, aircraft finance has grown a little older, a little wiser and much more timid about taking risks.

Sharing Aircraft Under FAR Part 91… 

For U.S. operators, charging someone for a ride in the company jet is a subject thick with claims and counterclaims, ignorance and outright bad behavior. The arguments are old, but some of the consequences are new. Today, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may be more likely than the FAA to punish practitioners of any "Part 134½."

Heliport Approval 

For many communities, building a heliport means new business opportunities, additional revenue and a new type of transportation. For the airport director, it's one more meeting with the FAA and one more stack of paperwork. As daunting as constructing or “renovating” a defunct heliport may seem, the process is easily divided into three manageable steps.

The construction and alteration of airports is governed by 14 C.F.R. Part 157. Notifying the FAA in a timely manner is a key part of the process.

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