John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1977 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites.
 
After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor.

Articles
Leesburg: A Stepwise Introduction Of Remote Towers For U.S. Airports  3
Controllers will use a mix of modern and traditional tools to scour the virtual skyline at remote-towered airports.
Forum: Training Is Subpar For Highly Automated Cockpits 
The acknowledgment is one of 19 flight-operations findings and conclusions agreed to by 251 pilots, regulators, aircraft operators and manufacturers who took part in a two-day Automation and Safety Forum in Brussels last month.
Safety Lapses Threatened Flydubai Flights 2
Safety lapses at low-fare carrier Flydubai and its maintenance, repair and overhaul provider, Jordan Aircraft Maintenance Company allowed for unlabeled, active oxygen generators to be shipped in hold cargo on two flights in late 2013.
Dutch NLR Explores ‘Fit to Fly’ Fatigue Test 
The two-year research project, funded by the U.K. Civil Aviation Authority, focused on methods of gauging the fatigue levels of individual pilots rather than taking a generic approach of controlling duty hours, a practice used in fatigue-risk-management systems.
House To Introduce Bill To Split FAA In July 

WASHINGTON—House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster says his committee soon will produce an FAA Reauthorization bill that will split the agency’s safety and air traffic control (ATC) and modernization roles. The bill could be on the House Floor in July, Shuster said in an Aero Club of Washington speech June 15. The move comes as the FAA’s most-recent four-year authorization expires at the end of September.

WAAS Feed To Boost Honeywell Ground-Based Augmentation System’s Accuracy 
The performance boost is the result of integrating a wide-area augmentation system (WAAS) receiver into the SLS-4000 to better predict changes in the ionosphere, a large factor in the accuracy of an aircraft’s derived position from GPS.
Efforts To Improve Tracking, Data Recovery Face Standardization Hurdles 
The global initiative to track aircraft constantly and recover post-crash data quickly generates as many questions as answers.
Air Canada Underrun Investigation Focuses On Pilots, Procedures 
The preliminary assessment, published by the Canadian Transportation Safety Board (TSB) on June 16, puts the focus of the crash on the pilots and the procedures used during the non-precision instrument approach to the runway in the midst of a relatively strong crosswind and snow showers that significantly limited visibility.
House To Introduce Bill To Split FAA In July 

WASHINGTON—House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster says his committee soon will produce an FAA Reauthorization bill that will split the agency’s safety and air traffic control (ATC) and modernization roles. 

“In talking with House Leadership, I believe the bill could be on the House Floor in July,” said Shuster at an Aero Club of Washington speech on June 15. The move comes as the FAA’s most-recent four-year authorization expires at the end of September. 

Hawaiian Airlines Testing IP-based Cockpit Services Link 
Trial could set the stage for broadband data to cross over from the cabin to the flight deck.
SwiftBroadband Cockpit-, Safety-Data Test Underway At Hawaiian 
As of early June, the carrier had one Boeing 767 equipped for the trial, but planned to have all nine of the aircraft type completed and participating by year-end.
CAE Unseats Flight Safety for C-12 Training
CAE will take Flight Safety International’s place as the turn-key initial and recurrent simulator and live flight training provider for more than 600 pilots who fly the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force C-12, starting in fall 2016.
SITA Readies For Boom In Airport Beacon Applications  2
Tiny Bluetooth devices will offer a variety of new services for passengers and airports as beacon technology goes mainstream.
CAE Unseats Flight Safety As C-12 Training Provider 
CAE will take Flight Safety International’s place as the turn-key initial and recurrent simulator and live flight training provider for more than 600 pilots who fly the U.S. Army and Air Force C-12 (Beechcraft King Air), starting in fall 2016.
Budapest Signals Mainstream Push For Remote Towers 
Remote towers are a reality in Europe, but it could possibly be years more before they are accepted in the U.S.
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