John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1978 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor, instrument instructor, multi-engine rated commercial pilot, and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites, including the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.

After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor before joining Aviation Week in 2012.

He, his wife, and two high school-aged boys live in the wilds of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where their two Weimaraners, EZ and Porter, can run amok. 

Articles
Should The MH370 Search Expand?  123
Despite the massive underwater search zone, the only traces of the aircraft found to date have been recovered pieces from islands in the western Indian Ocean and Africa.
Partnership Seeks To Smooth Maintenance Data Flow 
Hassle-free access to efficiency-boosting maintenance and operational data is now available through a new partnership between airline maintenance and inventory software provider Ultramain Systems, mobile data services provider, GigSky and avionics company Avionica.
FAA To Draw Blood In Sleep Deprivation Study 
The FAA plans to study the blood of more than 160 volunteers in a new trial to better understand the relationship between reduced or “mistimed” sleep and changes in gene expression, a process linked to the production of proteins by cells.
Ireland To Portugal: Make Laser Attacks A Criminal Offense 
The government of Portugal has not enacted laws that make shining a laser light on an aircraft a criminal offense, despite experiencing hundreds of laser attacks —and Ireland’s Air Accident Investigation Unit wants to change that.
Egypt: Explosive Materials On MS804 Passengers 
The Egyptian civil aviation ministry said “traces of explosive materials” were found in the bodies of some of the passengers on the crashed EgyptAir Flight 804.
Threats, Noise Keys To Israeli Performance-Based Navigation  3
Israel is showing the aviation industry a new use for noise-reducing and efficiency-boosting performance-based navigation procedures: avoiding the rocket’s red glare.
ATSB: Part Failures Behind 787 Engine Incidents  33
Part failures were the root cause of two Boeing 787 engine incidents for Jetstar Airways and Scoot Airlines in August and September 2016, respectively.
FAA Headquarters in Washington.
FAA Excels At Flight-Service Cost Savings 
Cost controls helped the FAA meet a 13-year cost savings target to within 3% after contracting out its 58 flight-service stations.
Is An Aircraft-Based Broadband Network Viable?  23
Airborne Wireless Networks’ “Infinitus Super Highway” replaces LEO satellites with aircraft in a mesh communications network to deliver broadband data.
New Venture Promises Ubiquitous Broadband 
A Simi Valley, California, company has launched a commercial venture to provide a broadband mesh network over the continental U.S. using commercial aircraft.
ATR 72 Icing Upset Draws Wide Attention 
French and Danish accident investigators and airframer ATR have joined with Norway’s Accident Investigation Board to figure out why a Scandinavian Airlines ATR 72-212 “banked uncontrollably and lost significant altitude” on Nov. 14.
New York Airport Privatization: Third Time’s A Charm? 
New York state’s Westchester County has applied to the FAA to privatize its commercial service reliever airport for the New York City metropolitan area, marking the third time since 2000 that the state or one of its counties has attempted such a spinoff under the FAA’s troubled Airport Privatization Pilot Program.
Corridors Taking Shape For Proving Civil UAS Operations 
Officials in the FAA’s UAS test sites across the U.S. are carving out hundreds of linear miles of airspace for proving the technologies and procedures needed for widespread beyond-visual-line-of-sight operations, a linchpin for success of commercial UAS ventures and other routine operations.
Corridors Taking Shape For Proving Civil UAS Operations 
Officials in the FAA’s UAS test sites are carving out hundreds of linear miles of airspace for proving the technologies and procedures needed for widespread beyond-visual-line-of-sight (BVLOS) operations, a linchpin for success of commercial UAS ventures and other routine operations.
U.S. Drone Corridors Taking Shape  2
The FAA’s UAS test sites across the U.S. are carving out hundreds of linear miles of airspace for proving out the technologies and procedures needed for widespread beyond visual line of sight operations.
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