John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1977 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites.
 
After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor.

Articles
RAA: ‘Negative Consequences’ From First-Officer Rule 
“Frankly, the [First Officer Qualification] places an emphasis on flight time that favors candidates who have amassed 1,500 hr. over candidates who have undertaken academic pathways through their piloting career but have not amassed 1,500 hr.,” said Faye Malarkey Black, interim president of the Regional Airline Association.
China Demonstrates GPS-Based Instrument Landing System 3
SmartPath, to date the only FAA-certified system on the market, is installed at several airports around the world, including Newark, Houston, Sydney and Frankfurt.
Regulators, Market To Determine Fate Of Synthetic Vision Guidance Systems 3
OEMs and avionics companies are turning to their customers to make the case for next-generation synthetic vision systems approval.
Honeywell Readies Situational Awareness Tools For Embraer E2 Pilots
Synthetic vision and exocentric 3-D taxi views are designed to boost situational awareness for less-experienced pilots.
ATR 72 Crew’s Ingenuity Cited In Rare Sea Salt Incident 2
The crew of an Aer Arann ATR 72 flying for Aer Lingus is credited with “good airmanship” in finding a way to remove salt deposits that had completely blocked the view forward from the twin turboprop’s windscreen while attempting to land at the Cork Airport in January 2014.
Podcast: The Rise of the Civilian UAV Industry
Until now, the military has driven development of unmanned aerial vehicles. But the U.S. Navy X-47B’s recent aerial refueling demonstration could be a transition point for the fledgling industry, in which commercial players are increasingly pushing the technical edge.
Cirrus Begins Assembly Of First Production SF50 Vision 
Rejuvenated by new financing from China, Cirrus Aircraft has certification in sight for its long-awaited single-engine personal jet.
Cirrus Closes In On Personal-Jet Finish Line After 10-Year Stretch
Rejuvenated by new financing from China, Cirrus Aircraft has certification in sight for its long-awaited single-engine personal jet.
Uncertainty Dogs Next-Generation Synthetic Vision Systems
OEMs and avionics companies are turning to their customers to make the case for next-generation synthetic vision systems approval.
Watchdog: FAA To Consider New Cybersecurity Certification Rules 
A panel of cybersecurity experts is expected to report back to the FAA by mid-2016 on whether the agency should issue new guidance or aircraft certification rules to prevent the intentional hacking of aircraft avionics systems, according to the Government Accountability Office.
Watchdog: FAA To Consider New Cybersecurity-Certification Rules 
The watchdog, in a new report detailing concerns with cybersecurity in the transition to NextGen, says the threat for intrusion is increasing as aircraft cockpits and the cabin-share Internet Protocol (IP) connectivity, primarily through information systems connected to both the cockpit avionics and the inflight entertainment systems.
Cirrus Begins Assembly Of First-Production SF50 Vision 
Four years ago, the future of Cirrus Aircraft’s single-engine jet was by all accounts in peril – the company had lost access to the Williams FJ33 turbofan engine powering its five-seat SF50 personal jet as U.S. officials determined whether the new owner, Chinese Aviation Industry General Aircraft, could have access to the technology in that engine.
Airbus, Boeing Set Sights On Synthetic Vision 2
Business jet and general aviation pilots already enjoy the safety benefits of synthetic vision. Airline pilots are next in line.
Delta Develops New Training For Full Stalls And Upsets  1
Airlines are going back to school to build new training programs to demonstrate deep-stall and upset recoveries in the simulator.
FAA Targets 2018 For GPS-Based Autoland Capability
The FAA says airlines may be able to begin using ground-based augmentation systems (GBAS) for satellite-based Category 3 instrument landings that culminate in a 50-ft. decision height or an automatic landing by 2018, offering a lower-cost alternative to legacy ground-based instrument landing systems (ILS).
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