John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1978 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor, instrument instructor, multi-engine rated commercial pilot, and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites, including the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.

After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor before joining Aviation Week in 2012.

He, his wife, and two high school-aged boys live in the wilds of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where their two Weimaraners, EZ and Porter, can run amok. 

Articles
Air Canada Flight 624 following the crash.
Passenger Behavior Highlighted In Canada Crash
In a scene increasingly repeated in non-fatal crashes, some passengers on Air Canada Flight 624 grabbed their carry-on bags before evacuating a heavily damaged Airbus A320 on the runway of the Halifax International Airport.
Australia Doubles Down On ATR Tail Talk  1
Although rare, the split-elevator scenario in the ATR 42 and 72 can overstress the aircraft’s horizontal stabilizer due to a newly uncovered control system phenomenon.
FAA Evaluating Options For Managing Aircraft Fleet
To control costs, FAA evaluates options for its 47-aircraft fleet, including leasing and contracting out some tasks.
FAA Evaluating Options For Managing Aircraft Fleet 
To control costs, FAA evaluates options for its 47-aircraft fleet, including leasing and contracting out some tasks.
Aireon Navigates Early Hurdles To Oceanic Free Flight 
A series of diamond shapes over the ocean—areas where there is no air traffic—signals room for improvement in cruise efficiency for airlines.
ICAO Sowing Global Seeds For Interoperable Small UAS 
The ICAO this September will hold the first of what officials hope to be a yearly event to address challenges and spur unimpeded but safe growth in the sector across borders.
ICAO To Sow Global Seeds For Interoperable Small UAS 
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) this September will hold the first of what officials hope will be a yearly event concerning small UAS.
ICAO Event To Sow Global Seeds For Interoperable Small UAS 
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) this September will hold the first of what officials hope will be a yearly event concerning small UAS.
Virgin Australia Regional Airlines ATR 72.
Is There A Problem With ATR Tails? 
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau said it is “not possible to fully determine the magnitude of the risk” associated with continued operation of ATR 42 and ATR 72 twin turboprops until a wide-ranging engineering analysis underway at ATR is complete in July.
Virgin Australia Regional Airlines ATR 72.
Turboprop Tails Cause Concern In Australia 
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau said it is “not possible to fully determine the magnitude of the risk” associated with continued operation of ATR 42 and ATR 72 twin turboprops until a wide-ranging engineering analysis underway at ATR is complete in July.
HUD Acceptance Gains Ground With Chinese Carriers 
The hyper political sensitivity over air safety in China helps to explain the CAAC’s willingness to take the worldwide lead in mandatory HUD installations for airlines.
Bahamas Excursion Highlights Larger Problem With Landings  34
The Bahamian Air Accident Investigation Department (AAID) has issued a searing report on safety problems at SkyBahamas Airlines in the aftermath of a 2013 runway excursion at Leonard M. Thompson International Airport.
Searidge remote tower.
Remote-Tower Outlook Drives NATS' First Acquisition 
NATS, the UK’s privatized air navigation services provider (ANSP), has made its first acquisition after more than 50 years in the business, taking a 50% share in Ottawa-based Searidge Technologies.
Icelandair Saves On E-Enabled 737 MAX Aircraft 
Icelandair will equip its 16 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft with a suite of e-enabled avionics built by Miami-based Avionica, saving the carrier $3 million over competing Boeing options initially and millions more over time.
Podcast: Uber’s Flying Taxi Plan and Personal Aviation 12
Uber has announced plans for an air taxi service. How realistic are they?
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