John Croft

John Croft
Senior Avionics & Safety Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Based in Washington, John is Aviation Week’s senior editor for avionics and safety. Along with being a part-owner of a 1978 Piper Archer II, John is an FAA-certified flight instructor, instrument instructor, multi-engine rated commercial pilot, and former NASA engineer who specialized in avionics and control systems for Earth-orbiting satellites, including the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.

After leaving NASA in 2000, he earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and went to work for several aerospace publications, most recently with Flight International as Americas Editor before joining Aviation Week in 2012.

He, his wife, and two high school-aged boys live in the wilds of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where their two Weimaraners, EZ and Porter, can run amok. 

Articles
Industry, Regulators Edge Closer To Beyond Line Of Sight UAS 
Demonstration flights and limited operational approvals are building experience and confidence in flying drones safely beyond visual line of sight of the operator.
This modified Boeing 777 flaperon replicates the found item.
Test Boosts Confidence In MH370 Crash Location  1
Australian researchers are more confident in their assessment of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370’s (MH370) final resting place after its disappearance in March 2014.
Lufthansa Technik Cockpit Contract Boosts IS&S Outlook 
Lufthansa Technik has teamed with Pennsylvania-based Innovative Solutions and Support as a supplier of glass cockpit retrofits for legacy Boeing 737, 757 and 767 flight decks.
Data-Driven Disruption Management Rules At American Airlines 
When Winter Storm Stella threatened blizzard conditions for the Northeast U.S. in mid-March, American’s response was based in part on a simulation.
Who Is In Charge Of Safety At Amsterdam Schiphol?  8
The Dutch Safety Board is calling on the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment to determine who in the government should have “final responsibility” for the safety of air traffic at and around Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.
LightSquared Successor Fuses Space and Ground Networks For UAS 1
Using ground stations and its SkyTerra 1 satellite, Ligado Networks believes it has the secret sauce for UAS beyond-visual-line-of-sight operations.
U.S. Agency Considers Fleet Consolidation 
The FAA is considering whether to consolidate or otherwise modify its fleet of 46 government-owned aircraft that are used for flight inspections; research and development; transport of government officials; and aviation safety training.
Pilot Report: Variable Stability Navion  17
Flight-test engineers and test pilots must learn to evaluate the characteristics of a digital control system in an airborne environment complete with G forces.
Clipped wing of Batik Air Boeing 737.
Controller Errors, Correct Crew Choices In Runway Collision  14
A nearly head-on runway collision at 134 kt. between a departing Batik Air Boeing 737-800 and an unpowered TransNusa Aviation ATR 42-600 in Jakarta on the night of April 4, 2016, could not have been avoided, even if the 737 crew aborted the takeoff at the first sign of trouble.
U.S. Agency Considers Fleet Consolidation 
The FAA is considering whether to consolidate or otherwise modify its fleet of 46 government-owned aircraft that are used for flight inspections; research and development; transport of government officials; and aviation safety training.
FAA To Study Fleet Consolidation 
The FAA is considering whether to consolidate or otherwise modify its fleet of 46 government-owned aircraft that are used for flight inspections; research and development; transport of government officials; and aviation safety training.
What Is The Certification Tipping Point?  39
The complexity of integrated systems and cross-border involvement have made certification costs higher than development costs for aerospace equipment.
FAMS training.
FAMS Seeks Scheduling Harmony With Armed Pilots 
The Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS) is looking to revamp its 15-year-old scheduling system to better optimize air marshal resources when an armed pilot is on the flight deck.
Security officers at Washington Dulles International Airport.
Congressman: More Countries Deploying Enhanced Security 
The U.S. House of Representatives’ top transportation security official said he anticipates more countries and airports to boost their passenger-screening measures, based on the intelligence reports he has seen.
Do Pilots Need Cyberwarnings?  2
Flight-critical systems are purposefully protected from hackers, but if someone does get through the many layers of security, pilots may want to know about it in their tactical response to an anomaly.
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