Graham Warwick

Graham
Warwick
Technology Managing Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Graham leads Aviation Week's coverage of technology, focusing on engineering and technology across the aerospace industry, with a special focus on identifying technologies of strategic importance to aviation, aerospace and defense. 

 

Born and educated in Scotland, he graduated in aeronautical engineering and worked in advanced design at Hawker Siddeley Aviation in the U.K. before becoming an aerospace journalist. Before joining Aviation Week in April 2008, he spent almost 30 years with weekly aerospace news magazine Flight International, most recently as Americas Editor based in the U.S. 

 

Graham is a winner of the Decade of Excellence award for aviation journalism, and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.

 

In 2013 the Jesse H. Neal award for Best Technical Content was awarded to Graham Warwick and Guy Norris for their Advanced Propulsion feature.

Articles
NASA’s Electric-Propulsion Wing Test Helps Shape Next X-Plane  7
Packing electric motors, electronic controllers, digital data buses and sensitive instrumentation into a small, slender wing proves a challenge that is shaping NASA’s thinking about Sceptor, its planned distributed electric propulsion X-plane
The Week in Technology, Aug. 24-28, 2015  1
Transonic buffet mitigation; sensor helps pierce brownout environments; airport noise reduction via steeper approaches trialed; "skycar" proposed to handle rescue missions
Podcast: Cockpits of the Future 2
What if commercial pilots never had to learn to fly IFR? The distinction between instrument flight rules and visual flight rules (VFR) may go away in the not-too-distant future. What if the Black Hawk successor offered military pilots a 360-degree, all-weather view on a touch screen that could easily be reconfigured? These are the sort of things we might see in next-gen cockpits. Join Aviation Week editors Jim Asker, John Croft and Graham Warwick in peering into the future.
The Week In Aerospace And Defense
The top aerospace and defense stories you may have missed this week include Airbus starts A350-1000 wing assembly and Lockheed Martin studies 'stealthy' U-2 replacement.
NASA To Demonstrate Self-Learning Flight Controls  1
NASA’s Learn-To-Fly project holds out the prospect of a radically different approach to flight testing new aircraft, particularly future unconventional and unfamiliar configurations
Bombardier Starts C Series Ramp-Up As Testing Passes 80% Mark 
To minimize the impact of any design changes resulting from flight test, “our strategy has been to wait until we were past 80% through certification, to make sure we have a mature aircraft before ramping up,” says Rob Dewar, vice president and general manager for C Series.
Bell, Lockheed Test Out Ideas For V-280 FVL Cockpit  19
Team developing V-280 Valor advanced tiltrotor for U.S. Army’s mid-2030s Future Vertical Lift rotorcraft is using a full-scale cockpit mock-up to define concepts for an advanced cockpit.
The New Flying Cars: How They Work 20
A closer look at the new crop of flying car designs.
UAS Firefighting Potential Explored By Nevada Researchers 
While unmanned aircraft have received bad press for forcing firefighters to halt aerial operations when one is sighted, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are widely regarded as potentially powerful tools for fighting wildfires that are becoming increasingly destructive as urban development expands into unoccupied land.
Nevada Researchers Look Into Potential Of UAS Firefighting 
While unmanned aircraft have received bad press for forcing firefighters to halt aerial operations when one is sighted, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are widely regarded as potentially powerful tools for fighting wildfires that are becoming increasingly destructive as urban development expands into unoccupied land.
Several Fly/Drive Vehicle Projects Make Progress 3
Want to get airborne to avoid congestion? Or land and drive to get through bad weather? Or just have fun in the air and on the road? There are several options on the horizon.
Canada Tests Sub-Hunting UAV 
Canada plans to test a small unmanned aircraft fitted with magnetic anomaly detector (MAD) sensors to see how well a UAV flying lower and slower than manned aircraft can detect submarines, mines and other metal objects beneath or on water.
Space-to-Space Power Beaming Could Enable Rapid Orbital Transfer  5
Electric propulsion for satellites is efficient, but low-thrust. An infrastructure of power-generation satellites in orbit would help speed the time it takes to change orbits
The Week in Technology, Aug. 17-21 
Unmanned aircraft in the news: hunting submarines in Canada; designing UAS to fight wildfires; forecasting weather with small UAVs; hybrid propulsion for small air vehicles
Nevada Researchers Explore UAS Firefighting Potential 
While unmanned aircraft have received bad press for forcing firefighters to halt aerial operations when one is sighted, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are widely regarded as potentially powerful tools for fighting wildfires that are becoming increasingly destructive as urban development expands into unoccupied land.
 

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