Frank Morring, Jr.

Frank Morring, Jr.
Senior Editor, Space,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Frank is a Senior Editor and has been a journalist for 40 years, specializing in aerospace for over 20 years. Frank joined Aviation Week in 1989 as a defense/space reporter and senior space technology editor. In 2007 he was named deputy managing editor/space, responsible for coordinating space coverage across all bureaus and publications. 
 
Frank began his career working for his hometown daily in Huntsville, Alabama, and moved to Washington in 1979 as correspondent for the Birmingham Post-Herald. He later covered the Cold War Pentagon for Scripps-Howard News Service. 
 
Frank received a degree in comparative literature from Dartmouth College. He has Goddard and Von Braun media awards from the National Space Club, and a Neal Award.

Articles
Lawmakers Get Mixed Messages On RD-180 Replacement 
Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) wants to focus on replacing the hydrocarbon-fueled Russian rocket engine used to launch most U.S. national security spacecraft, but the companies and military officials who can make that happen let him know Friday it won’t be that simple.
NASA Narrowing Down Human ‘Exploration Zones’ On Mars 
“The workshop is really about narrowing down where on Mars would satisfy human requirements,” Jim Green, the agency’s planetary-science director, told reporters. “Mars is an enormous place."
Astronomers Develop Coronagraph That Can Image Exoplanets 
A new optics technology that creates 3-D arrays of liquid crystals has allowed astronomers on Earth to resolve exoplanets orbiting a distant star by blocking the obscuring light of the star.
Grace Gives Another Reason To Support Earth Science  9
Senate action to restore funding for space-based Earth science sets up showdown with House climate science opponents, and the pope weighs in.
Early Color Imagery Shows Pluto, Charon Differences 
Some of the first color New Horizons images of Pluto and its largest moon Charon have answered one question – what color are they? But they have raised another – why are the two bodies in the same “binary dwarf” different colors?
Failure Is An Option—In Flight Testing  4
Spaceflight engineers understand the value of lessons learned from flight testing—and they budget for it.
Spaceflight Industries Spinoff Promises ‘Hourly’ Earth Images 
BlackSky Global, part of Spaceflight Industries, plans to launch a 60-satellite constellation to provide 1-meter imagery of the Earth with a quick turnaround.
Spaceflight Industries Spinoff Promises ‘Hourly’ Earth Images 
BlackSky Global, part of Spaceflight Industries, plans to launch a 60-satellite constellation to provide 1-meter imagery of the Earth with a quick turnaround.
NASA Solicits Commercial Cubesat Launches; Readies Two For Mars 1
NASA is upping its ante in the cubesat arena, with a request for proposals (RFP) designed to spur a commercial launch industry dedicated to the tiny spacecraft, and with separate plans to send two cubesats on a piggyback mission to Mars next year.
Full Senate Appropriators Outdo House In Commercial Crew Cut 
Unless the full Senate rejects the appropriations panel action, Boeing and SpaceX face slow-downs in their NASA contracts to develop private capsules to transport astronauts to the International Space Station.
Commercial Crew Request Gets A Deeper Cut In Senate Subcommittee 
The figure is lower than the $1 billion commercial crew spending level set by the House, and well under the $1.244 billion NASA requested for the coming fiscal year. Without that requested level of funding, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has said repeatedly, the agency won’t be able to meet its contract obligations to Boeing and SpaceX for launches of their CST-100 and Crew Dragon vehicles by the end of 2017, as planned.
Advanced Thruster Enables New Cubesat Apps  1
Nanosat technology comes into play
Mexico Buys A Ride To The Moon 4
The country’s space agency is partnering with Google Lunar X-Prize contender Astrobotic for payload delivery.
Mexico Buys A Ride To The Moon 
The country’s space agency is partnering with Google Lunar X-Prize contender Astrobotic for payload delivery.
Second Parachute Fails On Mars Decelerator Flight Test 
NASA suffered a second setback June 8 in its drive to develop entry, descent and landing (EDL) technology for an eventual human landing on Mars, with the failure of a redesigned supersonic parachute on a high-speed deceleration flight test off the coast of Hawaii.
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