Frank Morring, Jr.

Frank Morring, Jr.
Senior Editor, Space,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Frank is a Senior Editor and has been a journalist for 40 years, specializing in aerospace for over 20 years. Frank joined Aviation Week in 1989 as a defense/space reporter and senior space technology editor. In 2007 he was named deputy managing editor/space, responsible for coordinating space coverage across all bureaus and publications. 
 
Frank began his career working for his hometown daily in Huntsville, Alabama, and moved to Washington in 1979 as correspondent for the Birmingham Post-Herald. He later covered the Cold War Pentagon for Scripps-Howard News Service. 
 
Frank received a degree in comparative literature from Dartmouth College. He has Goddard and Von Braun media awards from the National Space Club, and a Neal Award.

Articles
Revived Kepler Finds A Planet 

NASA’s Kepler space telescope has detected its first exoplanet since it started operating with only two of its four reaction wheels functioning, validating the “K2” workaround that uses pressure from solar photons to hold its lock on nearby stars long enough to measure the faint dimming caused by transiting planets.

Cost, ‘Extensibility’ Questions Delay Asteroid Mission Decision 

NASA has delayed an expected decision on whether to bring a small asteroid or a boulder from a larger one into lunar orbit for astronauts to study, citing questions about whether the estimated $100 million more the second option would cost would be worth the technology gained for future human missions on the path to Mars.

Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot said Dec. 17 the decision likely will be delayed until early next year, in time to support a mission concept review (MCR) at the end of February. 

Revived Kepler Finds A Planet 
NASA’s Kepler space telescope has detected its first exoplanet since it started operating with only two of its four reaction wheels functioning.
Cost, ‘Extensibility’ Questions Delay Asteroid Mission Decision 
Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot said Wednesday the decision likely will be delayed until early next year, in time to support a mission concept review (MCR) at the end of February.
NASA Seeks Space Power-Beaming Ideas 
The request for information lists several generic possibilities, including beaming power between orbiting spacecraft, from an orbiting spacecraft to a “planetary asset,” and between fixed and mobile assets on a planetary surface.
Antares Upgrade Will Use RD-181s In Direct Buy From Energomash 8
Orbital Sciences Corp. will buy directly from Russia’s NPO Energomash a new rocket engine with a long heritage to replace the surplus Russian engines tentatively implicated in the Oct. 28 failure of an Antares launch vehicle with a load of cargo for the International Space Station.
Deep-Space Navigation Experiment Going to ISS 
NASA’s New Horizons Pluto probe is awake and getting ready to fly past the Solar System’s icy outlier and its moons next summer
Orion Flight Test Generated 200 GB Of Engineering Data 5
Data from the Orion flight test—recorded at much higher rates than the normal 1-Hz used operationally so engineers can pinpoint the changes in loads and other factors during the flight—will be used to validate models and improve designs.
Stop-Start NASA Funding Seen Slowing Deep-Space Development 
Republicans and Democrats alike on the House Science space subcommittee on Dec. 10 lamented the delaying effect of funding uncertainty on big-ticket development programs like the congressionally mandated heavy-lift Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion crew vehicle that will ride atop it.
Orion’s ‘Trial By Fire’ Delivers Data For Final Design 

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER/JOHNSON SPACE CENTER — NASA’s new Orion crew capsule flew its first test in space with clocklike precision Friday, using two unmanned orbits that took it deeper into space than any human spacecraft has gone since Apollo 17 before a bull’s-eye splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

New Horizons Wakes Up For Its Pluto Flyby 2
At 9:53 p.m. EST on Dec. 6 the 70-meter Deep Space Network antenna at Canberra, Australia, received a signal from the 478-kg (1,050-lb.) spacecraft indicating that it had switched from hibernation to active mode for the 18th time since it was launched on Jan. 19, 2006.
 
Blogs
Dec 18, 2014
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Fly to Cuba?

Will restored diplomatic relations between Cuba and the U.S. open travel and aviation aftermarket opportunities?...More
Dec 18, 2014
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SpaceX Slips ISS Cargo Run To Early January

Company opts to conduct second Falcon 9 static fire test before launch....More
Dec 15, 2014
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NavWeek: U.S.? You Bet

Counting on the U.S. right now in the region looks to be worth the gamble....More

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