Frank Morring, Jr.

Frank Morring, Jr.
Senior Editor, Space,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Frank is a Senior Editor and has been a journalist for 40 years, specializing in aerospace for over 20 years. Frank joined Aviation Week in 1989 as a defense/space reporter and senior space technology editor. In 2007 he was named deputy managing editor/space, responsible for coordinating space coverage across all bureaus and publications. 
 
Frank began his career working for his hometown daily in Huntsville, Alabama, and moved to Washington in 1979 as correspondent for the Birmingham Post-Herald. He later covered the Cold War Pentagon for Scripps-Howard News Service. 
 
Frank received a degree in comparative literature from Dartmouth College. He has Goddard and Von Braun media awards from the National Space Club, and a Neal Award.

Articles
Podcast: Commercializing the Space Station 5
NASA and other governments may have an end date for the International Space Station, but private companies are creating their own for commercial purposes.
NASA Moving Toward A Post-ISS Commercial Space Station  6
Concepts for the post-ISS era begin to emerge, including commercial space factories spun off the existing station, and test hardware set for launch in 2017 to manufacture potentially valuable optical fiber that can only be made in space.
Commercializing the Space Station
NASA and other governments may have an end date for the International Space Station, but private companies are creating their own for commercial purposes.
Latest Landings Continue March Toward Reusable Space Launchers 
Blue Origin has found its design for a one-chute-out landing of its New Shepard capsule worked as planned, and SpaceX is negotiating for a customer to ride a used Falcon 9 launch vehicle to orbit, as the two companies’ efforts to lower the cost of launch by reusing spacecraft gain steam.
ISS Research Shaping Mars Crew Selection, Health Care  3
Real-time analysis of human genetic response to the space environment may be coming, with enormous—and perhaps scary—implications.
DARPA Funding Laser Technology With Commercial Potential  1
Optical comms development for DARPA can boost commercial crosslinks as well.
U.S. Satellite-makers To Provide Concepts for Mars Orbiter 
NASA has picked five major U.S. satellite manufacturers to conduct four-month concept studies for a large Mars orbiter that would use solar electric propulsion (SEP) to reach the Red Planet after a launch as early as the planetary window in 2022.
Companies Planning For Commercial Space Stations 
Private companies are beginning to develop concepts and business plans for commercial successors to the government-funded International Space Station.
Fiber-optic Experiment Could Lead To Manufacturing On ISS  10
A Silicon Valley startup plans to send an experiment in fiber-optics manufacturing to the International Space Station next year in a bid to make to the first commercial products that require microgravity for their creation, and sell them at prices higher than the cost of launch.
Nontraditional Users Finding Way to Space Station 
Industrial researchers and entrepreneurs are finding new ways to use the International Space Station (ISS) to find profit in down-to-earth sectors far removed from the vacuum of space.
Japan’s ISS Lab Proves Its Worth 
JAXA has achieved long-term success for its JEM space lab on the ISS by sticking to its original plan as much as possible, regardless of short-term priorities.
Mars Orbiter Draws Interest As SEP Testbed  2
NASA looks for flexibility in its uses for solar-electric propulsion, in part to avoid political pitfalls.
Kibo Lab Drives Expanded U.S./Japan Research Collaboration 
Unique research assets on Japan’s Kibo space station module will enable closer cooperation between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency on the International Space Station.
Raft Of Space-Policy Issues Awaits Next U.S. Administration  8
Space exploration is likely to be lost in the “fear and loathing” that will attend the two U.S. political conventions upcoming this month. That is a shame, because the opportunities—and pitfalls —looming in the spaceflight endeavor this year cry out for a well-reasoned, coherent U.S. policy.
NASA May Pay Elon Musk To Land Scientific Instruments On Mars  45
NASA is ready to help Elon Musk land a Dragon capsule on Mars, and is taking a wait-and-see approach to sending its own expensive instruments along.
 

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