Fred George

Fred George
Senior Editor,
Business & Commercial Aviation

Fred is a senior editor with Business & Commercial Aviation. Fred is Aviation Week's aircraft evaluation specialist, having flown left seat in virtually every turbine-powered business jet produced in the past two decades. 
 
He has flown more than 150 individual aircraft types, ranging from the Piper J-3 Cub through Boeing and Airbus single-aisle jetliners, logging more than 5,700 hours of flight time. He has earned an Airline Transport Pilot certificate and four jet aircraft type ratings, and he remains an active pilot. Fred also specializes in avionics, aircraft systems and pilot technique reports. 
 
Fred was the first aviation journalist to fly the Boeing 787, Airbus A400M and Gulfstream G650. 
 
Prior to joining Aviation Week, he was an FAA designated pilot examiner [CE-500], instrument flight instructor and jet charter pilot. He also is former U.S. Naval Aviator who made three cruises to the western Pacific while flying the McDonnell-Douglas F-4J Phantom II. 
 
Fred has won numerous aviation journalism awards and serves as a Director of the San Diego Air & Space Museum.

Articles
Eclipse 550 

Sixteen years after conception, a decade since its first flight and $1.4 billion dollars later, the Eclipse 500 finally is maturing into a full-fledged business jet, albeit the tiniest in current production. The world’s first VLJ was endowed with promising but untested DNA. As a result, it went through one of the most difficult and time-consuming development cycles in the history of business aircraft.

Pratt & Whitney Canada PW610F-A Turbofans 

Sixteen years after conception, a decade since its first flight and $1.4 billion dollars later, the Eclipse 500 finally is maturing into a full-fledged business jet, albeit the tiniest in current production. The world’s first VLJ was endowed with promising but untested DNA. As a result, it went through one of the most difficult and time-consuming development cycles in the history of business aircraft.

Eclipse 550 Performance 

Range/Payload Profile — Each of the four payload/range lines was plotted from only two data points by B&CA, so they are highly simplistic approximations. The graph illustrates the Eclipse 550 at a 518-lb. payload, 1,109 nm at high-speed cruise in 3 hr. 26 min. FAR Part 23 50-ft.

Avio 2.7—Total Aircraft Intergration 

The Avio system is more than an avionics package; it is a dual redundant aircraft computer system that also controls electrical, fuel, engine support, environmental, ice protection landing gear, exterior lights, pressurization, trim control and fire extinguishing systems. The anti-skid braking system computer is a stand-alone unit that was not planned for the original aircraft.

TBM 900 

Cruising at 325 kt. at FL 310 may seem leisurely by very-light-jet standards, but when that’s combined with a 20 min., 15 sec. climb to maximum cruise altitude, the TBM 900 can meet or beat the trip times of the Eclipse 550 and Cessna Citation Mustang on most missions.

Easier Engine Control 

The TBM 900’s Pratt & Whitney Canada 1,825-hp PT6A-66D engine, flat rated to 850 shp to ISA+49C, gets a single power lever control that operates much like an automotive manual gear shift lever with an “h” pattern. The right side of the “h” controls condition modes, including feather, high and low idle, and cut off. The left side of the “h” controls power modes, including forward and reverse thrust, plus ground fine pitch, taxi power functions. Normal operating prop speed in flight is 2,000 rpm.

Enhanced G1000 Avionics 

The TBM 900’s Garmin avionics package has been thoroughly upgraded. Pressurization control now is automatic by means of an FMS function, version 14 software makes possible display of weather radar imagery on the MFD map, and a solid-state GWX70 Doppler turbulence detection radar replaces the GWX68 magnatron unit.

Several cockpit components, including the overhead panel, landing gear control panel and ice protection controls, plus the pressurization and bleed air control panel, circuit breaker panels and power quadrant, have been redesigned for better ergonomics.

Canadair SE/Challenger 850 

Ease into a large chair in any one of the Challenger 850’s three roomy cabin sections and you’d be hard-pressed to tell you’re not in a Global 6000. The cabin has the same 6.0-ft. height and 8.1-ft. width as Bombardier’s current flagship. The 1993-2004 Canadair Special Edition and 1995-2011 Challenger 850 are the two main commercial designations for 50-seat CRJs that Canadair and Bombardier delivered green for custom conversion into business aircraft.

The Flight Department Ops Manual
Risk management starts with standardization and discipline
Global 6000's Vision Flight Deck
The Global 6000’s cockpit, featuring Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion avionics, is a work in progress.
Bombardier Global 6000
Capability, reliability and product support build brand loyalty.
Latest Blogs
Jul 27, 2014
blog

Oshkosh -- A Personal Journey

Destination Oshkosh: From grass roots to greatest show on earth...More
Jul 27, 2014
blog

L-29 FAST Flight with the Mach Man

The smell of jet fuel at sunrise is a worthy substitute for high test coffee on most days...More
Jul 25, 2014
blog

SpaceX on Rumored Layoffs 1

California company sees 5% workforce reduction...More
Jul 25, 2014
blog

Understanding How Casualties Are Counted

In researching our cover package on aeromedical evacuation, one of the hardest things to grapple with was how to count casualties. It turns out that even those experienced in the field can become confused on what metric is the most appropriate to use in any given circumstance....More
Jul 25, 2014
blog

Check 6 Podcast: Buk M-1 Missile vs. Flight MH17. What Went Wrong?

So what might have gone wrong that allowed a Buk-M1 missile to take down MH17?...More
Jul 25, 2014
blog

Anatomy of a Crash-Site Investigation

France deploys troops in support of AH5017 recovery effort....More

More blogs

NEW: Sign up to Aviation Week eBulletin

Daily analysis on technology advances impacting the global aviation, aerospace & defense industries.

Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×