Amy Butler

Amy
Butler
Senior Pentagon Editor,
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Amy is Aviation Week's senior Pentagon editor and has flown on a variety of military aircraft since joining the staff, including a 9-hr. HH-60G Pave Hawk search-and-rescue mission after Hurricane Katrina, and the MV-22 Osprey, UH-72A Lakota, F/A-18F Super Hornet, F-16CJ, BAE Hawk trainer and C-2 Greyhound carrier capable transport.
 
As senior Pentagon editor, Amy covers major U.S. military aviation programs, including the Joint Strike Fighter, next-generation bomber and KC-46A aerial refueler. She also specializes in coverage of missile defense and military space programs.
 
Prior to joining Aviation Week, she was the Pentagon bureau chief for Defense Daily covering multiple services' programs, the defense budget and Defense Department dealings with Congress. She worked as the managing editor of Inside the Air Force covering Air Force procurement and policy issues. Prior to that, she was the The Daily Sun's military reporter in Warner Robins, Ga., where she participated in a two-week media trip to Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia, and reported on Air Force activities supporting the no-fly zone over Iraq. 
 
Amy studied English literature and history at Mercer University in Macon, Ga., and took a term at Oxford University, England.

Articles
ULA CEO Steps Down In Face of Competition 

Michael Gass, first CEO of the U.S. military launch monopoly United Launch Alliance (ULA), will retire from the company at year’s end, just as it faces a potential competition for work with upstart Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX).

New USAF Space Surveillance Sats Past Early ‘Bumps’ In Deployment 
The service has not yet established a date to begin operating the two new Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program (GSSAP) satellites because work is ongoing to check out the bus and support systems for the first-of-its-kind design.
ULA CEO Steps Down In Face of Competition 2
Gass is stepping down as ULA faces unprecedented scrutiny over the cost of its launch services for the U.S. government.
Bell, Sikorsky/Boeing To Build Army JMR Rotorcraft Demonstrators 6
The Sikorsky/Boeing team will build the 230 kt.-plus SB.1 Defiant rigid coaxial-rotor compound helicopter and Bell the 280-kt. V-280 Valor tiltrotor in the first phase of the Joint Multi Role technology demonstration.
F-35C, Ship Prep Ongoing Despite Restrictions 

The grounding and subsequent restricted flight regime of the F-35 fleet are not expected to affect its ability to get prepared for its first deployment on a U.S. aircraft carrier in November, according to program officials. 

F-35C, Ship Prep Ongoing Despite Restrictions 
The grounding and subsequent restricted flight regime of the F-35 fleet are not expected to affect its ability to get prepared for its first deployment on a U.S. aircraft carrier in November, according to program officials.
Next-Generation Fighter, Directed Energy Weapons May Converge 19
Limited F-22, F-35 firepower magazine drives USAF investment plans
U.S. Army Joint Multi-Role Downselect Slated For Next Month 

U.S. Army officials are planning to reveal their downselect of candidates for building the service’s Future Vertical Lift (FVL) aircraft next month; the decision had been expected this month.

U.S. Army Joint Multi-Role Downselect Slated For Next Month 
It is unclear how many contracts the Army will issue to provide for flying demonstrators, though officials have said they hope to fund at least two flying prototypes.
USAF’s Network: An Advantage And Vulnerability 
As the U.S. military becomes increasingly networked, questions persist about just how protected this valuable information backbone is and how reliant forces should be on it.
U.S. Air Force Eyes Sixth-Gen Technologies 
The head of Air Combat Command is agnostic on whether sixth-gen systems should be manned or unmanned, or even a fighter at all. But "we are already behind the line to get something on the ramp," Gen. Mike Hostage says.
New USAF Satellites To Spy On Other Satellites 
The first two of four U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program (GSSAP) satellites – designed to provide unprecedented intelligence on orbiting spacecraft – were launched into orbit last night by a United Launch Alliance Delta IV rocket in the company’s 85th successful boost mission since forming in 2006.
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